AWHONN’S Neonatal Skin Care RU project: Implementation strategies at a level III nursery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150365
Type:
Presentation
Title:
AWHONN’S Neonatal Skin Care RU project: Implementation strategies at a level III nursery
Abstract:
AWHONN’S Neonatal Skin Care RU project: Implementation strategies at a level III nursery
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Stringer, Marilyn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania
Title:Assistant Professor
The Association of Women’s Health Obstetrical and Neonatal Nursing (AWHONN) selected our Level III nursery as a neonatal skin care research utilization (RU) site. Our next challenge was implementation of this project. Fortunately, RU nursing experts helped guide our implementation strategy that identified 6 areas to facilitate project success. These 6 areas included a justification of need, 5 key interdisciplinary provider roles, 2 key operational meetings, problem solving opportunities, project recognition within the health system and local community and most importantly, on-going evidence of practice change. Initially, we performed a need assessment and developed a justification proposal (i.e., project rationale, external and internal support, and the institutional cost both in time and money) for approval from our administration. Next, 5 key provider roles were identified including a research champion, nurse manager, department chair, clinical director and staff nurse champions. After forging this groundwork, training and practice guidelines were provided and additionally supplies obtained. Weekly meetings to assist with implementation focused on time line accountability, protocol use, problem solving and team support. At our monthly interdisciplinary meetings, our program was a standard agenda item. Two main issues complicated implementation including a continued high census and acuity and an extended work leave of a champion nurse. Project dissemination incorporated staff in-services; protocols and articles availability, oral and poster presentations and publications. Permanent change was evidenced by 6-practice changes and protocol integration into our critical care course. Lastly, our neighboring colleagues at the internationally renowned children’s hospital have learned from our project and implemented these protocols at their facility.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAWHONN’S Neonatal Skin Care RU project: Implementation strategies at a level III nurseryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150365-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">AWHONN&rsquo;S Neonatal Skin Care RU project: Implementation strategies at a level III nursery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stringer, Marilyn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">stringer@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Association of Women&rsquo;s Health Obstetrical and Neonatal Nursing (AWHONN) selected our Level III nursery as a neonatal skin care research utilization (RU) site. Our next challenge was implementation of this project. Fortunately, RU nursing experts helped guide our implementation strategy that identified 6 areas to facilitate project success. These 6 areas included a justification of need, 5 key interdisciplinary provider roles, 2 key operational meetings, problem solving opportunities, project recognition within the health system and local community and most importantly, on-going evidence of practice change. Initially, we performed a need assessment and developed a justification proposal (i.e., project rationale, external and internal support, and the institutional cost both in time and money) for approval from our administration. Next, 5 key provider roles were identified including a research champion, nurse manager, department chair, clinical director and staff nurse champions. After forging this groundwork, training and practice guidelines were provided and additionally supplies obtained. Weekly meetings to assist with implementation focused on time line accountability, protocol use, problem solving and team support. At our monthly interdisciplinary meetings, our program was a standard agenda item. Two main issues complicated implementation including a continued high census and acuity and an extended work leave of a champion nurse. Project dissemination incorporated staff in-services; protocols and articles availability, oral and poster presentations and publications. Permanent change was evidenced by 6-practice changes and protocol integration into our critical care course. Lastly, our neighboring colleagues at the internationally renowned children&rsquo;s hospital have learned from our project and implemented these protocols at their facility.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:44Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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