Transcultural Nursing Practicums: An Innovative Teaching Strategy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150366
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transcultural Nursing Practicums: An Innovative Teaching Strategy
Abstract:
Transcultural Nursing Practicums: An Innovative Teaching Strategy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Demaree, Dena
One of the best methods to prepare nursing students to practice in a globally diverse society is to provide a transcultural nursing practicum. These authors developed such a practicum in 1996 based on changing demographics. Their nursing students have the option of traveling to Haiti, the world’s poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, for a two-week practicum. Based on their five years of experience with working with students in this area, the authors will discuss practical ways to prepare students for the practicum. Although students can never be totally prepared for this experience, they receive instruction on cultural differences and challenges they will face. These challenges include adjustment to a different climate, language barriers, and the lack of health care resources. Students are also taught about common medical diseases and conditions prevalent among the Haitians. These diseases include malnutrition, burns, malaria, tuberculosis, and parasites. Suggestions of how to choose a transcultural nursing site will be offered. This practicum is facilitated through the Northwest Haiti Christian Organization that developed a medical clinic and birthing center. Students practice in these clinics, travel to rural outlying communities and make home visits under their instructor’s supervision. Transcultural nursing experiences offer many benefits to students. They have the opportunity to enhance their clinical skills and to use their nursing knowledge. Students must rely on their physical assessment skills to diagnose illnesses due to the lack of laboratory and radiological services. They must apply their pharmacology knowledge when dispensing medications because a pharmacist is usually unavailable. This practicum allows students to apply Madeleine Leininger’s Culture Care Theory. They recognize that caring plays an essential role in providing health care. Students frequently comment on the Haitians’ appreciation of the health care they provide. However, they quickly identify factors that affect the Haitians’ health care beliefs. These factors include a belief in witch doctors’ abilities to cure diseases, a belief of hot/cold balance, and the lack of education regarding preventative and secondary care. The most important benefit provided by these type of practicums is the students’ opportunity to introspectively examine their thoughts and feelings about people of different cultures. Students are encouraged to process their experiences through daily journals and discussion groups with instructors. Every student who has taken this course has commented on how it gave them more sensitivity and empathy for patients of another culture.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTranscultural Nursing Practicums: An Innovative Teaching Strategyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150366-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Transcultural Nursing Practicums: An Innovative Teaching Strategy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Demaree, Dena</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">One of the best methods to prepare nursing students to practice in a globally diverse society is to provide a transcultural nursing practicum. These authors developed such a practicum in 1996 based on changing demographics. Their nursing students have the option of traveling to Haiti, the world&rsquo;s poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, for a two-week practicum. Based on their five years of experience with working with students in this area, the authors will discuss practical ways to prepare students for the practicum. Although students can never be totally prepared for this experience, they receive instruction on cultural differences and challenges they will face. These challenges include adjustment to a different climate, language barriers, and the lack of health care resources. Students are also taught about common medical diseases and conditions prevalent among the Haitians. These diseases include malnutrition, burns, malaria, tuberculosis, and parasites. Suggestions of how to choose a transcultural nursing site will be offered. This practicum is facilitated through the Northwest Haiti Christian Organization that developed a medical clinic and birthing center. Students practice in these clinics, travel to rural outlying communities and make home visits under their instructor&rsquo;s supervision. Transcultural nursing experiences offer many benefits to students. They have the opportunity to enhance their clinical skills and to use their nursing knowledge. Students must rely on their physical assessment skills to diagnose illnesses due to the lack of laboratory and radiological services. They must apply their pharmacology knowledge when dispensing medications because a pharmacist is usually unavailable. This practicum allows students to apply Madeleine Leininger&rsquo;s Culture Care Theory. They recognize that caring plays an essential role in providing health care. Students frequently comment on the Haitians&rsquo; appreciation of the health care they provide. However, they quickly identify factors that affect the Haitians&rsquo; health care beliefs. These factors include a belief in witch doctors&rsquo; abilities to cure diseases, a belief of hot/cold balance, and the lack of education regarding preventative and secondary care. The most important benefit provided by these type of practicums is the students&rsquo; opportunity to introspectively examine their thoughts and feelings about people of different cultures. Students are encouraged to process their experiences through daily journals and discussion groups with instructors. Every student who has taken this course has commented on how it gave them more sensitivity and empathy for patients of another culture.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:22:45Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:22:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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