2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150380
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Between You and Me
Abstract:
Between You and Me
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Cullen, Lynne
P.I. Institution Name:Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario
I am a nurse working in a pediatric hospital. The art that I have produced over the past four years is based on my experience in the medical profession. It deals with the struggle that we as healthcare providers face on a daily basis as we care for patients and their families. We struggle to keep our composure when a young father is dying. We put on a brave face when a baby is diagnosed with cancer. The list goes on as long as the day. In order to sustain ourselves we must establish a barrier, a suit of armor. It is through art that I believe we can take an unprotected look at the emotional impact of caring, taking off that armor, if only for a few minutes. My job as an Intravenous Nurse allows me to travel throughout the hospital, thereby acting as an observer when not directly involved in a given situation. Emotionally charged scenes or “captured moments in time”, interactions between doctors, nurses, patients and families are translated into a piece of sculpture or a drawing. The medium selected is dictated by the subject matter, which has included a vast assortment of materials, for example: plaster, wood, bottles, mirror, wax, metal and bone. My work deals with the ideas of loneliness, vulnerability, fragility and degradation. A central theme in my work is the infliction of pain. My latest installation piece entitled “168 needles” is a collection of intravenous and butterfly needles taken from individual patients. Each needle is placed in a cork-sealed bottle and sits on a wooden grid structure. The number 168 is specific to the concept of children having needles inserted into them 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The duality of the feeling of pain is addressed in the piece, the giver and the recipient. The work is conceptually based and deals with issues of risk, disease and individuality. The chair series, three sculptures made in 2000 also have as their theme the concept of pain. The chairs have been transformed into Surrealist pieces. “The Bone Chair” is a plaster coated dining room chair placed on an angle. The use of rusty nails, a large bone and a casting of a human leg evoke a sense of unease and torture. “The Meat Chair”, a rice paper coated armchair appears as a flayed person, hands knotted and vulnerable. The last chair in the series, “Traction” a small bone-coloured wooden chair, legs crossed, lying on its back, deals with the notion of permission, violation and the amount of control that a patient has within the institution. In the series “Patient, Object” I have addressed the issue of objectivity. These six small wooden frames have as their central image the photograph of a young girl placed against a backdrop of a measurement grid. The image was taken from an instructional textbook of human malformations and completely objectifies her. The smallness of the work amplifies the feeling of being trapped. It is my wish that she would object-speak out against what is happening to her. Over the past four years I have exhibited my work to medical professionals. My first exhibit took place at the Health Sciences Centre, University of Ottawa. This venue allowed me access to various healthcare workers, medical and nursing students, doctors and laboratory technicians and I was able to discuss how the work evolved. Subsequent to that I was asked to exhibit at my own place of employment, then in other hospitals in the Ottawa area. I feel privileged to show my work to as many people as possible in order to initiate dialogue, to discuss relevant healthcare issues, whether these individuals are directly involved in the healthcare system or not. My art provides an outlet for the sharing of stories and that is what motivates me to create new work. This is where I feel that art has a role. It can reach out and grab someone who cannot be caught by words. By making healthcare providers more aware and sensitive to “captured moments in time”, by providing a way to cope with the daily encounters with illness, accident and misfortune art can help heal. I am convinced that all healthcare providers can express their thoughts and feelings through art.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBetween You and Meen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150380-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Between You and Me</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cullen, Lynne</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children&rsquo;s Hospital of Eastern Ontario</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynne_edith@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">I am a nurse working in a pediatric hospital. The art that I have produced over the past four years is based on my experience in the medical profession. It deals with the struggle that we as healthcare providers face on a daily basis as we care for patients and their families. We struggle to keep our composure when a young father is dying. We put on a brave face when a baby is diagnosed with cancer. The list goes on as long as the day. In order to sustain ourselves we must establish a barrier, a suit of armor. It is through art that I believe we can take an unprotected look at the emotional impact of caring, taking off that armor, if only for a few minutes. My job as an Intravenous Nurse allows me to travel throughout the hospital, thereby acting as an observer when not directly involved in a given situation. Emotionally charged scenes or &ldquo;captured moments in time&rdquo;, interactions between doctors, nurses, patients and families are translated into a piece of sculpture or a drawing. The medium selected is dictated by the subject matter, which has included a vast assortment of materials, for example: plaster, wood, bottles, mirror, wax, metal and bone. My work deals with the ideas of loneliness, vulnerability, fragility and degradation. A central theme in my work is the infliction of pain. My latest installation piece entitled &ldquo;168 needles&rdquo; is a collection of intravenous and butterfly needles taken from individual patients. Each needle is placed in a cork-sealed bottle and sits on a wooden grid structure. The number 168 is specific to the concept of children having needles inserted into them 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The duality of the feeling of pain is addressed in the piece, the giver and the recipient. The work is conceptually based and deals with issues of risk, disease and individuality. The chair series, three sculptures made in 2000 also have as their theme the concept of pain. The chairs have been transformed into Surrealist pieces. &ldquo;The Bone Chair&rdquo; is a plaster coated dining room chair placed on an angle. The use of rusty nails, a large bone and a casting of a human leg evoke a sense of unease and torture. &ldquo;The Meat Chair&rdquo;, a rice paper coated armchair appears as a flayed person, hands knotted and vulnerable. The last chair in the series, &ldquo;Traction&rdquo; a small bone-coloured wooden chair, legs crossed, lying on its back, deals with the notion of permission, violation and the amount of control that a patient has within the institution. In the series &ldquo;Patient, Object&rdquo; I have addressed the issue of objectivity. These six small wooden frames have as their central image the photograph of a young girl placed against a backdrop of a measurement grid. The image was taken from an instructional textbook of human malformations and completely objectifies her. The smallness of the work amplifies the feeling of being trapped. It is my wish that she would object-speak out against what is happening to her. Over the past four years I have exhibited my work to medical professionals. My first exhibit took place at the Health Sciences Centre, University of Ottawa. This venue allowed me access to various healthcare workers, medical and nursing students, doctors and laboratory technicians and I was able to discuss how the work evolved. Subsequent to that I was asked to exhibit at my own place of employment, then in other hospitals in the Ottawa area. I feel privileged to show my work to as many people as possible in order to initiate dialogue, to discuss relevant healthcare issues, whether these individuals are directly involved in the healthcare system or not. My art provides an outlet for the sharing of stories and that is what motivates me to create new work. This is where I feel that art has a role. It can reach out and grab someone who cannot be caught by words. By making healthcare providers more aware and sensitive to &ldquo;captured moments in time&rdquo;, by providing a way to cope with the daily encounters with illness, accident and misfortune art can help heal. I am convinced that all healthcare providers can express their thoughts and feelings through art. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:05Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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