2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150381
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Values – A shield for death and dying
Abstract:
Values – A shield for death and dying
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Hysell-Lynd, Mary
P.I. Institution Name:Ohio University
Nurses spend more time with dying clients than any other health care professional. Most deaths continue to occur in institutional settings, so all nurses have and/or will encounter death and dying during their nursing careers. Quality nursing care for clients who are living with dying begins with the assessment of the nurse’s own value system regarding death and dying. ‘A Shield of Death & Dying’ is an artistic exercise used by the author in a basic nursing education program. Nursing students are given 10 minutes to complete the exercise in which they must DRAW pictures to depict their answers to 5 questions that focus on a dying client’s autonomy, previous loss experience, transcendence while dying, major fears regarding dying, and goals/hopes of the dying client. Once the students complete the exercise, the papers are redistributed among students to provide anonymity of the authors. Students then share the responses to the exercise and identify common issues. Finally, students critically analyze how nurses can assist clients with these issues to maximize wellness while the client is living with dying. Students have written common evaluative remarks about this exercise. Some of these remarks include: “I never thought about how important some of those things are to all of us”; “the exercise gave me new insight about the roles of the nurse with the dying patient”; drawing my answers was hard but I seemed to really ‘feel’ my responses as well as ‘think’ about them”; and “it seems to put me in the role of the dying person—living the experience—gave me cold chills and something to think about”. The students’ comments reflect on the effectiveness of the exercise.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValues – A shield for death and dyingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150381-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Values &ndash; A shield for death and dying</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hysell-Lynd, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ohio University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynd@ohiou.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses spend more time with dying clients than any other health care professional. Most deaths continue to occur in institutional settings, so all nurses have and/or will encounter death and dying during their nursing careers. Quality nursing care for clients who are living with dying begins with the assessment of the nurse&rsquo;s own value system regarding death and dying. &lsquo;A Shield of Death &amp; Dying&rsquo; is an artistic exercise used by the author in a basic nursing education program. Nursing students are given 10 minutes to complete the exercise in which they must DRAW pictures to depict their answers to 5 questions that focus on a dying client&rsquo;s autonomy, previous loss experience, transcendence while dying, major fears regarding dying, and goals/hopes of the dying client. Once the students complete the exercise, the papers are redistributed among students to provide anonymity of the authors. Students then share the responses to the exercise and identify common issues. Finally, students critically analyze how nurses can assist clients with these issues to maximize wellness while the client is living with dying. Students have written common evaluative remarks about this exercise. Some of these remarks include: &ldquo;I never thought about how important some of those things are to all of us&rdquo;; &ldquo;the exercise gave me new insight about the roles of the nurse with the dying patient&rdquo;; drawing my answers was hard but I seemed to really &lsquo;feel&rsquo; my responses as well as &lsquo;think&rsquo; about them&rdquo;; and &ldquo;it seems to put me in the role of the dying person&mdash;living the experience&mdash;gave me cold chills and something to think about&rdquo;. The students&rsquo; comments reflect on the effectiveness of the exercise.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:07Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.