2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150385
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Frequency and Severity of Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis
Abstract:
Frequency and Severity of Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Schweitzer, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Objective: Fatigue is now recognized as the most common and least understood symptom of Multiple Sclerosis. The purpose of this study was to: 1) describe the frequency and severity of fatigue in MS patients; 2) compare the relationship of MS disease classifications and neurologic impairment rating; 3) describe the relationship between MS disease classifications and fatigue frequency and severity; and 4) explore the rate of unemployment disability among this MS population. Design: Descriptive, quantitative research study utilizing Neuman’s Health Care Systems Model. Sample: A convenience sample of 113 adult subjects who had a clinically definite diagnosis of MS. All subjects had been seen at least once in the past year by a neurologist who independently performed a neurologic exam, assessed the patient’s disability using the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS), and established their MS disease classification. Four subjects chose not to completely answer each item on the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) and Frequency of Fatigue Scale (FFS) (n=109). Setting: A mid-western outpatient rehabilitation clinic. Names of Variables or Concept: MS and MS-related fatigue were the independent variables. The outcome measures and the dependent variable were: 1) frequency of MS-related fatigue as measured by the Fatigue Frequency Scale Questionnaire; 2) severity of MS-related fatigue as measured by the Frequency of Fatigue Scale; 3_ MS disease classification established by a neurologist; 4) neurologic impairment measured by the EDSS; and 5) unemployment disability as self-reported. Measures,/Instruments: Data was collected over a two week period from a chart review of all MS patients seen within a one year period at an outpatient clinic. Self-reported FSS and FFS questionnaires, MS disease classifications, and EDSS were obtained from each subject’s chart from the date of their last outpatient clinic visit. Demographics included age, sex, marital status, and disability status. Data were analyzed using numeric descriptive techniques and analysis of variance. Findings: Over 97% reported experiencing fatigue in activities of daily living in the past 24 hours. Most subjects (46.9%) perceived experiencing fatigue as often as half the time and 14.2% reported having fatigue always. The majority of subjects (56.0%) perceived fatigue as being severe and one of their three most disabling symptoms. A wide variation in EDSS rating occurred in all MS classifications except primary progressive. Overall, frequency of fatigue and severity of fatigue by MS disease classification demonstrated statistically significant mean differences between relapse-remitting and secondary progressive (p=0.008) and between relapse-remitting and primary progressive (p=0.001), respectively. The majority of subjects were female (71.1%) and 51.2% were classified as disabled. Of the male population, 46.9% were disabled. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that: 1) fatigue is a very prevalent and severe problem in MS; 2) EDDS rating may not predict MS disease classification; 3) fatigue impact cannot be predicted by clinical measures of MS disease classifications; 4) almost half of MS subjects were disabled and unemployed. Implications: Findings can be used to determine the clinical relevance and utility of self-reported fatigue measures like the FSS, MFIS and FFS in managing MS-related fatigue. Study results can be further used to develop, implement and evaluate multiple strategies of interventions in the management of fatigue.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFrequency and Severity of Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150385-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Frequency and Severity of Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schweitzer, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Kathleen_Schweitzer@und.nodak.</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Fatigue is now recognized as the most common and least understood symptom of Multiple Sclerosis. The purpose of this study was to: 1) describe the frequency and severity of fatigue in MS patients; 2) compare the relationship of MS disease classifications and neurologic impairment rating; 3) describe the relationship between MS disease classifications and fatigue frequency and severity; and 4) explore the rate of unemployment disability among this MS population. Design: Descriptive, quantitative research study utilizing Neuman&rsquo;s Health Care Systems Model. Sample: A convenience sample of 113 adult subjects who had a clinically definite diagnosis of MS. All subjects had been seen at least once in the past year by a neurologist who independently performed a neurologic exam, assessed the patient&rsquo;s disability using the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS), and established their MS disease classification. Four subjects chose not to completely answer each item on the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) and Frequency of Fatigue Scale (FFS) (n=109). Setting: A mid-western outpatient rehabilitation clinic. Names of Variables or Concept: MS and MS-related fatigue were the independent variables. The outcome measures and the dependent variable were: 1) frequency of MS-related fatigue as measured by the Fatigue Frequency Scale Questionnaire; 2) severity of MS-related fatigue as measured by the Frequency of Fatigue Scale; 3_ MS disease classification established by a neurologist; 4) neurologic impairment measured by the EDSS; and 5) unemployment disability as self-reported. Measures,/Instruments: Data was collected over a two week period from a chart review of all MS patients seen within a one year period at an outpatient clinic. Self-reported FSS and FFS questionnaires, MS disease classifications, and EDSS were obtained from each subject&rsquo;s chart from the date of their last outpatient clinic visit. Demographics included age, sex, marital status, and disability status. Data were analyzed using numeric descriptive techniques and analysis of variance. Findings: Over 97% reported experiencing fatigue in activities of daily living in the past 24 hours. Most subjects (46.9%) perceived experiencing fatigue as often as half the time and 14.2% reported having fatigue always. The majority of subjects (56.0%) perceived fatigue as being severe and one of their three most disabling symptoms. A wide variation in EDSS rating occurred in all MS classifications except primary progressive. Overall, frequency of fatigue and severity of fatigue by MS disease classification demonstrated statistically significant mean differences between relapse-remitting and secondary progressive (p=0.008) and between relapse-remitting and primary progressive (p=0.001), respectively. The majority of subjects were female (71.1%) and 51.2% were classified as disabled. Of the male population, 46.9% were disabled. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that: 1) fatigue is a very prevalent and severe problem in MS; 2) EDDS rating may not predict MS disease classification; 3) fatigue impact cannot be predicted by clinical measures of MS disease classifications; 4) almost half of MS subjects were disabled and unemployed. Implications: Findings can be used to determine the clinical relevance and utility of self-reported fatigue measures like the FSS, MFIS and FFS in managing MS-related fatigue. Study results can be further used to develop, implement and evaluate multiple strategies of interventions in the management of fatigue.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:13Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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