Advanced Practice Nursing in Acute and Critical Care Environments: National ACNP Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150386
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Advanced Practice Nursing in Acute and Critical Care Environments: National ACNP Study
Abstract:
Advanced Practice Nursing in Acute and Critical Care Environments: National ACNP Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Kleinpell, Ruth, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The purpose of this study is to explore the role of Nurse Practitioners working in acute care settings. Acute Care Nurse Practitioners (ACNPs) represent a growing number of advanced practitioners who are forging out new roles in acute care practice settings. Since the first availability of national certification for ACNPs in 1995, over 2000 advanced practice nurses have sought certification. This presentation will discuss the results from an ongoing 5-year longitudinal survey with 545 ACNPs who were certified from 1995 to 1998. In order to compare and contrast roles and aspects of ACNPS not included in the original longitudinal cohort, a survey was conducted in November, 2000 to all persons certified as ACNPs from 1998 to July 2000 (n=1038). The results from these newly certified ACNPs will also be presented. Design: Descriptive exploratory study with the use of mailed questionnaires. Sample: Nurse practitioners certified as ACNPs from 1995 through 1998 who have continued to participate in a five-year longitudinal survey (n=545), and newly certified ACNPs (1998 to July 2000, n=1038). Setting: Acute and critical care practice settings. Variables: work environment, aspects of practice, role components, satisfaction with ACNP position, outcomes of practice. Measures: 44-item survey questionnaire, based on adaptations of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Pediatric Physician Extender Survey. Findings: ACNPs report a wide range of practice areas including tertiary and secondary care settings. Aspects of practice reflect a comprehensive care model, including management of patient care, consultation, discharge planning, and discussing care with families. Majority report satisfaction with their position and are experiencing increased independence, responsibility, autonomy, security, confidence, and more role acceptance. Issues identified include the need for RN experience both for ACNP program admission requirements and for ACNP practice, an educational curriculum with adequate physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology and diagnostic reasoning, and the importance of negotiation and networking. Implications for ACNP educational programs, ACNP practitioners and suggestions for those contemplating pursuing an ACNP position will also be presented. Conclusions: Responses from over 1000 ACNPs reveal continued development and expansion of the ACNP role. ACNPs are advancing on the continuum from novice to expert practitioners, yet are experiencing issues related to role expansion, including establishing the role, obtaining role recognition, and combating barriers to practice. Implications: The role of the ACNP continues to expand. Changes in health care will continue to bring new opportunities and challenges to the ACNP role. Continued monitoring of role evolution remains indicated to identify further advancement opportunities and issues in practice for ACNPs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdvanced Practice Nursing in Acute and Critical Care Environments: National ACNP Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150386-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Advanced Practice Nursing in Acute and Critical Care Environments: National ACNP Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kleinpell, Ruth, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rkleinpell@rushu.rush.du</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study is to explore the role of Nurse Practitioners working in acute care settings. Acute Care Nurse Practitioners (ACNPs) represent a growing number of advanced practitioners who are forging out new roles in acute care practice settings. Since the first availability of national certification for ACNPs in 1995, over 2000 advanced practice nurses have sought certification. This presentation will discuss the results from an ongoing 5-year longitudinal survey with 545 ACNPs who were certified from 1995 to 1998. In order to compare and contrast roles and aspects of ACNPS not included in the original longitudinal cohort, a survey was conducted in November, 2000 to all persons certified as ACNPs from 1998 to July 2000 (n=1038). The results from these newly certified ACNPs will also be presented. Design: Descriptive exploratory study with the use of mailed questionnaires. Sample: Nurse practitioners certified as ACNPs from 1995 through 1998 who have continued to participate in a five-year longitudinal survey (n=545), and newly certified ACNPs (1998 to July 2000, n=1038). Setting: Acute and critical care practice settings. Variables: work environment, aspects of practice, role components, satisfaction with ACNP position, outcomes of practice. Measures: 44-item survey questionnaire, based on adaptations of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Pediatric Physician Extender Survey. Findings: ACNPs report a wide range of practice areas including tertiary and secondary care settings. Aspects of practice reflect a comprehensive care model, including management of patient care, consultation, discharge planning, and discussing care with families. Majority report satisfaction with their position and are experiencing increased independence, responsibility, autonomy, security, confidence, and more role acceptance. Issues identified include the need for RN experience both for ACNP program admission requirements and for ACNP practice, an educational curriculum with adequate physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology and diagnostic reasoning, and the importance of negotiation and networking. Implications for ACNP educational programs, ACNP practitioners and suggestions for those contemplating pursuing an ACNP position will also be presented. Conclusions: Responses from over 1000 ACNPs reveal continued development and expansion of the ACNP role. ACNPs are advancing on the continuum from novice to expert practitioners, yet are experiencing issues related to role expansion, including establishing the role, obtaining role recognition, and combating barriers to practice. Implications: The role of the ACNP continues to expand. Changes in health care will continue to bring new opportunities and challenges to the ACNP role. Continued monitoring of role evolution remains indicated to identify further advancement opportunities and issues in practice for ACNPs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:15Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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