ICU Syndrome: Current Documentation Practices, Relationship Between Physiological Measures and Behaviors, and Consistency Among Three Neurological Measures

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150387
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ICU Syndrome: Current Documentation Practices, Relationship Between Physiological Measures and Behaviors, and Consistency Among Three Neurological Measures
Abstract:
ICU Syndrome: Current Documentation Practices, Relationship Between Physiological Measures and Behaviors, and Consistency Among Three Neurological Measures
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Widener, Jeanne
P.I. Institution Name:Ohio State University
PROBLEM: Intensive care (ICU) syndrome occurs in an estimated one-third of patients. Physiological alterations that occur in critically ill patients effect cognitive and psychological function. Management of behaviors associated with ICU syndrome requires significant nursing attention. Nursing management of ICU syndrome most often includes physical restraint and/or pharmacological therapy. Traditionally, health care professionals believe that correction of the underlying physiological alterations will decrease the behaviors associated with ICU syndrome. However, research does not support this belief. In fact, negative psychological effects attributed to ICU syndrome may require long-term intervention in some patients. Critical care nurses currently use multiple measurement scales to evaluate the patient behavior and provide support for nursing interventions used to treat ICU syndrome. SPECIFIC AIMS: The specific aims of this study are to: 1) describe the documentation practices related to behaviors associated with ICU syndrome during the first 48 hours of ICU admission; 2) compare the documented results of 3 scales that evaluate cognitive function and overt behaviors (the Glascow Coma Scales, Modified Ramsey Sedation Score, and general neurological assessment); and 3) evaluate whether physiological measures are different in those subjects with and without ICU syndrome during the first 48 hours of ICU admission. DESIGN: A descriptive, retrospective medical records review pilot study. SAMPLE: A random sample of 52 intensive care patients in a mid-western academic medical center. DATA ANALYSIS: Descriptive statistics will be used to describe the sample and report frequencies of documentation. Bias and precision will be calculated to compare the documentation of cognitive state and behaviors among the 3 scales. To evaluate differences in the physiological measures, t-test and chi square will be used as appropriate to the measurement level 9of the variable. Differences will be considered significant with a p < 0.05. NURSING IMPLICATIONS: Patients with behaviors associated with ICU syndrome require increased nursing management and these individuals may experience long-term complications related to this experience. ICU syndrome may also significantly increase health care costs. Scales used in current practice may not be sensitive indicators of altered cognitive function and behavior changes. In addition, these scales may not be reliable indicators of ICU syndrome.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleICU Syndrome: Current Documentation Practices, Relationship Between Physiological Measures and Behaviors, and Consistency Among Three Neurological Measuresen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150387-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">ICU Syndrome: Current Documentation Practices, Relationship Between Physiological Measures and Behaviors, and Consistency Among Three Neurological Measures</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Widener, Jeanne</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">widener.6@osu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PROBLEM: Intensive care (ICU) syndrome occurs in an estimated one-third of patients. Physiological alterations that occur in critically ill patients effect cognitive and psychological function. Management of behaviors associated with ICU syndrome requires significant nursing attention. Nursing management of ICU syndrome most often includes physical restraint and/or pharmacological therapy. Traditionally, health care professionals believe that correction of the underlying physiological alterations will decrease the behaviors associated with ICU syndrome. However, research does not support this belief. In fact, negative psychological effects attributed to ICU syndrome may require long-term intervention in some patients. Critical care nurses currently use multiple measurement scales to evaluate the patient behavior and provide support for nursing interventions used to treat ICU syndrome. SPECIFIC AIMS: The specific aims of this study are to: 1) describe the documentation practices related to behaviors associated with ICU syndrome during the first 48 hours of ICU admission; 2) compare the documented results of 3 scales that evaluate cognitive function and overt behaviors (the Glascow Coma Scales, Modified Ramsey Sedation Score, and general neurological assessment); and 3) evaluate whether physiological measures are different in those subjects with and without ICU syndrome during the first 48 hours of ICU admission. DESIGN: A descriptive, retrospective medical records review pilot study. SAMPLE: A random sample of 52 intensive care patients in a mid-western academic medical center. DATA ANALYSIS: Descriptive statistics will be used to describe the sample and report frequencies of documentation. Bias and precision will be calculated to compare the documentation of cognitive state and behaviors among the 3 scales. To evaluate differences in the physiological measures, t-test and chi square will be used as appropriate to the measurement level 9of the variable. Differences will be considered significant with a p &lt; 0.05. NURSING IMPLICATIONS: Patients with behaviors associated with ICU syndrome require increased nursing management and these individuals may experience long-term complications related to this experience. ICU syndrome may also significantly increase health care costs. Scales used in current practice may not be sensitive indicators of altered cognitive function and behavior changes. In addition, these scales may not be reliable indicators of ICU syndrome.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:16Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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