2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150388
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence-Based Outcomes in Pulmonary Rehabilitation
Abstract:
Evidence-Based Outcomes in Pulmonary Rehabilitation
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Daniels, Karen
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine specific functional, quality of life, and medical outcomes for patients with chronic pulmonary disease who participated in a comprehensive 36-session outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program and to establish baseline data for future comparison. Design: The study was an exploratory descriptive design. Sample: The sample was comprised of 196 subjects who completed a 36-session Phase II pulmonary rehabilitation program. The sample was comprised of 77 males and 119 females. Thirteen were African-American and 183 were Caucasian. The mean age was 67.75 years with an age range from 35 to 87. Setting: The study setting was a 731-bed tertiary care facility with a 29 county catchment area in the southeastern United States. Variables: The variable outcomes studied were functional (walking), quality of life and medical (occurrences of unscheduled physician office visits, emergency department visits and hospital stays). Instruments. Instruments for data collection and pre- and post- comparisons were variable specific. The distance in feet walked in a standardized six-minute walk determined functional outcomes. Quality of life indices were measured by the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index-pulmonary version. This instrument was administered and scored by a clinical psychologist following the instrument scoring instructions. Medical outcomes were self-reported pulmonary-related occurrences of unscheduled physician office visits, emergency department visits and hospital stays for the three-month period prior to starting the program and later during phase II. Findings: The difference in mean feet walked during the six-minute walk was statistically significant at p<.005 demonstrating an improvement from pre-phase II (926 feet) to post phase II (1158 feet). Quality of Life Indices depicting mean scores Pre and Post Phase II demonstrated statistical significance in all sub-scales and in the overall score. Further, the number of unscheduled pulmonary-related physician visits declined from Pre-Phase II to later Phase II. Forty-four percent of the self-reporting subjects had one or more unscheduled physician visits prior to the program compared to only 31 percent later in phase II. Conclusions: Patients who completed Phase II of the pulmonary rehabilitation program demonstrated significant improvement in functional, quality of life, and medical outcomes. Implications: This study contributes to the body of research focused on outcomes in pulmonary rehabilitation that is both ongoing and national in scope. Studies that continue to show improved patient outcomes and medical cost savings in this era of harsh fiscal reality dispel the notion that rehabilitation programs are frivolous.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence-Based Outcomes in Pulmonary Rehabilitationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150388-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evidence-Based Outcomes in Pulmonary Rehabilitation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Daniels, Karen</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karend@esn.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine specific functional, quality of life, and medical outcomes for patients with chronic pulmonary disease who participated in a comprehensive 36-session outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program and to establish baseline data for future comparison. Design: The study was an exploratory descriptive design. Sample: The sample was comprised of 196 subjects who completed a 36-session Phase II pulmonary rehabilitation program. The sample was comprised of 77 males and 119 females. Thirteen were African-American and 183 were Caucasian. The mean age was 67.75 years with an age range from 35 to 87. Setting: The study setting was a 731-bed tertiary care facility with a 29 county catchment area in the southeastern United States. Variables: The variable outcomes studied were functional (walking), quality of life and medical (occurrences of unscheduled physician office visits, emergency department visits and hospital stays). Instruments. Instruments for data collection and pre- and post- comparisons were variable specific. The distance in feet walked in a standardized six-minute walk determined functional outcomes. Quality of life indices were measured by the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index-pulmonary version. This instrument was administered and scored by a clinical psychologist following the instrument scoring instructions. Medical outcomes were self-reported pulmonary-related occurrences of unscheduled physician office visits, emergency department visits and hospital stays for the three-month period prior to starting the program and later during phase II. Findings: The difference in mean feet walked during the six-minute walk was statistically significant at p&lt;.005 demonstrating an improvement from pre-phase II (926 feet) to post phase II (1158 feet). Quality of Life Indices depicting mean scores Pre and Post Phase II demonstrated statistical significance in all sub-scales and in the overall score. Further, the number of unscheduled pulmonary-related physician visits declined from Pre-Phase II to later Phase II. Forty-four percent of the self-reporting subjects had one or more unscheduled physician visits prior to the program compared to only 31 percent later in phase II. Conclusions: Patients who completed Phase II of the pulmonary rehabilitation program demonstrated significant improvement in functional, quality of life, and medical outcomes. Implications: This study contributes to the body of research focused on outcomes in pulmonary rehabilitation that is both ongoing and national in scope. Studies that continue to show improved patient outcomes and medical cost savings in this era of harsh fiscal reality dispel the notion that rehabilitation programs are frivolous.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:18Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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