2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150395
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Efficacy and Stage of Change Behavior Among Older Adults
Abstract:
Self-Efficacy and Stage of Change Behavior Among Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Bawel, Karen
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern Indiana
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: Self-efficacy has been identified as a determinate of exercise behavior but little is known about what older adults think about their ability to perform strength training exercises. The objective was to learn about the role of self-efficacy among older adult when categorized according to their exercise stage of change behavior. Design: Bandura’s Theory of Self-Efficacy provided the theoretical framework for this exploratory study. The Transtheoretical Model of Behavioral Change was used to identify the older adults exercise stage of change behavior. The variables were measured: a) initial; b) six weeks; and 3) twelve weeks. To prevent preconceived decisions of participation, older adults participating in group activities unrelated to exercises or exercise behaviors were targeted. Exercise stage of change behavior was assessed first. Self-efficacy was assessed following the verbal presentation, and the viewing a video-tape with older actors demonstrating the exercises, and reviewing the exercise handbook with the guidelines and instructions. Each volunteer was given a video-tape, exercise handbook (guidelines and instructions), and a set of elastic bands (Therabands ) for completing the questionnaires. Hypotheses were tested using one of the following statistics: ANOVA, Friedman’s test, Chi-Square, paired t-test, and independent t-test. Sample and Setting: Inclusion criteria for selection of subjects included: 1) aged 60 years and older, 2) recorded a “no” on all questions on the Revised Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire, or 3) medical clearance from a physician. Older adults, in Indiana, participating in community activities other than exercise were approach to volunteer. A convenience sample included community-dwelling older adults (N=91) aged sixty-five and older (M=73.8 years). Findings: Forty-eight percent of the subjects (n=85) reported that they did not participate in a regular exercise behavior. The older adult “deciders” had a higher self-efficacy at six (F = 7.23, p =.01 and at twelve weeks (F =10.38, p = .002) than the “nondeciders”. Findings support that older adults who tried the strength training exercises had a higher total self-efficacy at six (x 2 = 7.95, p =.005) and at twelve weeks (x = 8.32, p = .004). Conclusions: Findings are confined to this sample. The findings support the use of Stage of Change Behavior in identifying exercise behavior toward strength training exercises. Significant findings support Bandura’s Theory of Self-Efficacy regarding strength training exercises and a home strength training program among older adults. Implications: Self-efficacy appears to be one factor in stage of change behavior in the home environment. Strategies to enhance self-efficacy may improve older adult’s participating in a home strength training program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Efficacy and Stage of Change Behavior Among Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150395-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Efficacy and Stage of Change Behavior Among Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bawel, Karen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern Indiana</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kbawel@usi.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Self-efficacy has been identified as a determinate of exercise behavior but little is known about what older adults think about their ability to perform strength training exercises. The objective was to learn about the role of self-efficacy among older adult when categorized according to their exercise stage of change behavior. Design: Bandura&rsquo;s Theory of Self-Efficacy provided the theoretical framework for this exploratory study. The Transtheoretical Model of Behavioral Change was used to identify the older adults exercise stage of change behavior. The variables were measured: a) initial; b) six weeks; and 3) twelve weeks. To prevent preconceived decisions of participation, older adults participating in group activities unrelated to exercises or exercise behaviors were targeted. Exercise stage of change behavior was assessed first. Self-efficacy was assessed following the verbal presentation, and the viewing a video-tape with older actors demonstrating the exercises, and reviewing the exercise handbook with the guidelines and instructions. Each volunteer was given a video-tape, exercise handbook (guidelines and instructions), and a set of elastic bands (Therabands ) for completing the questionnaires. Hypotheses were tested using one of the following statistics: ANOVA, Friedman&rsquo;s test, Chi-Square, paired t-test, and independent t-test. Sample and Setting: Inclusion criteria for selection of subjects included: 1) aged 60 years and older, 2) recorded a &ldquo;no&rdquo; on all questions on the Revised Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire, or 3) medical clearance from a physician. Older adults, in Indiana, participating in community activities other than exercise were approach to volunteer. A convenience sample included community-dwelling older adults (N=91) aged sixty-five and older (M=73.8 years). Findings: Forty-eight percent of the subjects (n=85) reported that they did not participate in a regular exercise behavior. The older adult &ldquo;deciders&rdquo; had a higher self-efficacy at six (F = 7.23, p =.01 and at twelve weeks (F =10.38, p = .002) than the &ldquo;nondeciders&rdquo;. Findings support that older adults who tried the strength training exercises had a higher total self-efficacy at six (x 2 = 7.95, p =.005) and at twelve weeks (x = 8.32, p = .004). Conclusions: Findings are confined to this sample. The findings support the use of Stage of Change Behavior in identifying exercise behavior toward strength training exercises. Significant findings support Bandura&rsquo;s Theory of Self-Efficacy regarding strength training exercises and a home strength training program among older adults. Implications: Self-efficacy appears to be one factor in stage of change behavior in the home environment. Strategies to enhance self-efficacy may improve older adult&rsquo;s participating in a home strength training program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:27Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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