Development of a Quality of Life Instrument for Stroke Survivors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150397
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of a Quality of Life Instrument for Stroke Survivors
Abstract:
Development of a Quality of Life Instrument for Stroke Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Secrest, Janet
P.I. Institution Name:University of Tennessee-Chattanooga
Introduction. Stroke is a common cause of disability worldwide. A national research priority for stroke rehabilitation cited in the AHCPR Clinical Practice Guidelines is the development and validation of standardized tests for monitoring post-stroke rehabilitation (p.8). An important area to monitor is quality of life (QOL). Existing QOL measures have been developed from either researcher determined domains, or those from healthy populations. None has been derived from the stroke survivors, themselves. A phenomenological inquiry into the QOL following stroke (by this author) yielded a thematic structure of life following stroke. Objective. The purpose of this study is to develop a valid, reliable, and parsimonious measure of QOL following stroke, derived from the stroke survivors themselves. Design. A 46-item summative scale questionnaire was developed from the themes found in the phenomenological study of QOL following stroke. Content for the specific statements supporting the themes were derived directly from the transcripts. Each of the 4 themes has 10-12 representative statements, which were reviewed by a variety of content experts, including stroke survivors. The format of the instrument, including response categories, typeset, etc. was based upon recent studies of instrument effectiveness in the stroke population. The instrument is currently being administered to stroke survivors. Data analysis will involve descriptive and inferential statistics, including factor analysis, Cronbach’s Alpha and item analysis. Sample. IRB approval from appropriate agencies has been obtained. The sample will consist of approximately 200-300 stroke survivors, recruited from local physicians’ offices, rehabilitation hospitals, and the community. Those with any of the following criteria are excluded: 1) prior stroke, 2) inability to complete instruments because of language or cognitive impairments, 3) significant comorbidities affecting QOL (e.g., heart failure, dialysis, AIDS, metastatic cancer, neurological or musculoskeletal disorders). Setting. The instruments will be administered in physicians’ offices, rehabilitation hospitals, and in the community (at community centers and/or in participants’ homes). Variables. The concept under study is quality of life following stroke. Measures. In addition to the CSS (described above), a Barthel Index (measure of functional ability), and a Cantril Ladder for pre and post stroke quality of life will be used. Demographic data will be gathered. Findings. Data collection is currently underway. Conclusions. Data collection is currently underway. Implications. This study will contribute to nursing as well as to the field of stroke rehabilitation, an interdisciplinary endeavor. Measuring outcomes has become increasingly important, and this instrument will provide the means to evaluate the impact of interventions (many of which were suggested in the initial phenomenological study) on the quality of life for stroke survivors, the most common patient population in rehabilitation units.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of a Quality of Life Instrument for Stroke Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150397-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development of a Quality of Life Instrument for Stroke Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Secrest, Janet</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Tennessee-Chattanooga</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Janet-Secrest@utc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction. Stroke is a common cause of disability worldwide. A national research priority for stroke rehabilitation cited in the AHCPR Clinical Practice Guidelines is the development and validation of standardized tests for monitoring post-stroke rehabilitation (p.8). An important area to monitor is quality of life (QOL). Existing QOL measures have been developed from either researcher determined domains, or those from healthy populations. None has been derived from the stroke survivors, themselves. A phenomenological inquiry into the QOL following stroke (by this author) yielded a thematic structure of life following stroke. Objective. The purpose of this study is to develop a valid, reliable, and parsimonious measure of QOL following stroke, derived from the stroke survivors themselves. Design. A 46-item summative scale questionnaire was developed from the themes found in the phenomenological study of QOL following stroke. Content for the specific statements supporting the themes were derived directly from the transcripts. Each of the 4 themes has 10-12 representative statements, which were reviewed by a variety of content experts, including stroke survivors. The format of the instrument, including response categories, typeset, etc. was based upon recent studies of instrument effectiveness in the stroke population. The instrument is currently being administered to stroke survivors. Data analysis will involve descriptive and inferential statistics, including factor analysis, Cronbach&rsquo;s Alpha and item analysis. Sample. IRB approval from appropriate agencies has been obtained. The sample will consist of approximately 200-300 stroke survivors, recruited from local physicians&rsquo; offices, rehabilitation hospitals, and the community. Those with any of the following criteria are excluded: 1) prior stroke, 2) inability to complete instruments because of language or cognitive impairments, 3) significant comorbidities affecting QOL (e.g., heart failure, dialysis, AIDS, metastatic cancer, neurological or musculoskeletal disorders). Setting. The instruments will be administered in physicians&rsquo; offices, rehabilitation hospitals, and in the community (at community centers and/or in participants&rsquo; homes). Variables. The concept under study is quality of life following stroke. Measures. In addition to the CSS (described above), a Barthel Index (measure of functional ability), and a Cantril Ladder for pre and post stroke quality of life will be used. Demographic data will be gathered. Findings. Data collection is currently underway. Conclusions. Data collection is currently underway. Implications. This study will contribute to nursing as well as to the field of stroke rehabilitation, an interdisciplinary endeavor. Measuring outcomes has become increasingly important, and this instrument will provide the means to evaluate the impact of interventions (many of which were suggested in the initial phenomenological study) on the quality of life for stroke survivors, the most common patient population in rehabilitation units.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:30Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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