Assessment of Professional Nursing Students Knowledge and Attitudes about Patients of Diverse Cultures

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150400
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessment of Professional Nursing Students Knowledge and Attitudes about Patients of Diverse Cultures
Abstract:
Assessment of Professional Nursing Students Knowledge and Attitudes about Patients of Diverse Cultures
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Bond, Mary
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at Arlington
Objective: The purpose of the study was to describe professional nursing students’ personal attitudes toward culturally diverse patients and their perceived knowledge of specific cultural practices and culture specific skills for caring for patients of three ethnic groups, Hispanic African American and Anglo and to determine the relationship between attitudes and perceived confidence in knowledge of cultural patterns for each group. A second goal of the study was to describe differences in attitudes and knowledge by program type. Design: The design of the study was descriptive. Sample: A convenience sample of 152 students (48 BSN, 62 RN to BSN, and 42 MSN) enrolled in an NLNAC accredited School of Nursing in the southwestern part of the United States was used. Student participation was voluntary and anonymity was assured through coding of information which was reported as group data. Setting: Packets containing information about the study, the consent form and instruments to be completed were distributed in group meetings in the School of Nursing. Students completed the questionnaires at a place of their choice and returned the packets to a designated area in the Research Center in the School of Nursing. Concepts: Concepts studied were the perceived knowledge of specific cultural practices and culture specific skills. Differences in attitudes and skills were also examined by program type. Instruments: Three instruments were used to collect data: the Ethnic Attitude Scale – Part I (EAS), the Transcultural Questionnaire and a demographic survey. Findings: No statistically significant differences were found in attitudes, perceived knowledge of cultural patterns or perceived cultural skills by program. While generic BSN students had slightly more perceived knowledge of cultural concepts than either RN to BSN or MSN students, findings suggest that students in all three programs had a relatively low knowledge base about specific cultural groups. Conclusions: This study, as other singular studies of measurement of provider attitudes and perceived cultural knowledge reinforce the struggle experienced by educators and health care administrators grappling with the teaching and delivery of culturally competent care. Implications: Findings have implications for nurse educators for strengthening their own knowledge base and commitment to teaching about culture as a significant variable and to examining models and teaching strategies to assist students moving along the continuum of cultural learning.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessment of Professional Nursing Students Knowledge and Attitudes about Patients of Diverse Culturesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150400-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessment of Professional Nursing Students Knowledge and Attitudes about Patients of Diverse Cultures</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bond, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at Arlington</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mlbond@uta.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of the study was to describe professional nursing students&rsquo; personal attitudes toward culturally diverse patients and their perceived knowledge of specific cultural practices and culture specific skills for caring for patients of three ethnic groups, Hispanic African American and Anglo and to determine the relationship between attitudes and perceived confidence in knowledge of cultural patterns for each group. A second goal of the study was to describe differences in attitudes and knowledge by program type. Design: The design of the study was descriptive. Sample: A convenience sample of 152 students (48 BSN, 62 RN to BSN, and 42 MSN) enrolled in an NLNAC accredited School of Nursing in the southwestern part of the United States was used. Student participation was voluntary and anonymity was assured through coding of information which was reported as group data. Setting: Packets containing information about the study, the consent form and instruments to be completed were distributed in group meetings in the School of Nursing. Students completed the questionnaires at a place of their choice and returned the packets to a designated area in the Research Center in the School of Nursing. Concepts: Concepts studied were the perceived knowledge of specific cultural practices and culture specific skills. Differences in attitudes and skills were also examined by program type. Instruments: Three instruments were used to collect data: the Ethnic Attitude Scale &ndash; Part I (EAS), the Transcultural Questionnaire and a demographic survey. Findings: No statistically significant differences were found in attitudes, perceived knowledge of cultural patterns or perceived cultural skills by program. While generic BSN students had slightly more perceived knowledge of cultural concepts than either RN to BSN or MSN students, findings suggest that students in all three programs had a relatively low knowledge base about specific cultural groups. Conclusions: This study, as other singular studies of measurement of provider attitudes and perceived cultural knowledge reinforce the struggle experienced by educators and health care administrators grappling with the teaching and delivery of culturally competent care. Implications: Findings have implications for nurse educators for strengthening their own knowledge base and commitment to teaching about culture as a significant variable and to examining models and teaching strategies to assist students moving along the continuum of cultural learning.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:34Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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