Advanced Practice Nurses in Emergency Departments: A Needs Assessment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150401
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Advanced Practice Nurses in Emergency Departments: A Needs Assessment
Abstract:
Advanced Practice Nurses in Emergency Departments: A Needs Assessment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Rehwaldt, Maureen
P.I. Institution Name:Emergency Nurses Association
Objective: Advanced practice nurses (APNs), particularly emergency nurse practitioners have been practicing in the emergency care setting for over 25 years. Since the education of APNs in emergency care varies depending on whether the program included a specific focus in emergency care, the educational needs of these nurses are not known. The purpose of this study was to identify the educational needs of this group in order to target a regional educational program for advanced practice nurses who work in emergency care settings. Design: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted. Sample and Setting: A convenience sample of 64 Advanced Practice Nurses attending an annual conference in a large metropolitan Midwestern city participated in the study. Name of Variables or Concepts: Advanced practice nurses, educational needs, nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist. Measures/Instruments: A 98 item advanced practice survey was designed for the study. The first 20 questions described demographic data, current practice area, years in nursing and years in emergency care. The second section of 14 items focused on interest in products (i.e., certification exam for nurse practitioner or clinical nurse specialist, self-study programs etc) and services (i.e., internet courses, regional conferences, etc). The last section of 64 items were forced choice questions listing possible educational needs and included clinical skills as well as advanced role classes. The survey was included in the registration packet of each nurse attending an annual conference. Participants were invited to participate and return the questionnaire to a designated area. Findings: The majority of respondents had state recognition as an advanced practice nurse. There were a total of 14 clinical nurse specialists and 35 nurse practitioners. Over one-half of the nurses attended a nurse practitioner program, one-fourth attended a clinical nurse specialist program and a small percentage (13%) graduated from a combined clinical nurse specialist-nurse practitioner program. One third of the clinical focus of the nurses’ education program was family (38%), followed by emergency care (33%), and critical care (19%). Most of the nurse practitioners were certified as family nurse practitioners (53%), worked in urban areas an average of 28.6 hours/week and worked in both main and fast track emergency departments. The priority educational needs of the nurse practitioners were dermatological conditions, advanced pharmacology, and orthopedic injuries and for the clinical nurse specialists, advanced pharmacology, laboratory interpretation, and applying research to practice. The priority skill labs chosen by the nurse practitioners were complex wound care and radiographic interpretation and for clinical nurse specialists, radiographic interpretation and 12/15 lead EKG. More clinical nurse specialists than nurse practitioners favored self-study programs (for advanced pharmacology, advanced physiology, certification exam, etc). Most APNs favored regional conferences for advanced practice nurses. Conclusions: Advanced practice nurses in emergency department settings have varied educational needs that include both clinical skills as well as educational content in specific areas. The information from this survey will help to design a regional conference that will include relevant skill labs and education on dermatological conditions, orthopediatric injuries, laboratory interpretation, and applying research to practice. Other educational programs can also be designed for local hospitals. Implications: This study has implications for hospitals and other health care settings who need to plan future programs for advanced practice nurses practicing in emergency care settings. Ongoing assessment of educational needs of APNs needs to continue in order to determine future conferences, and courses that will ensure quality emergency practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdvanced Practice Nurses in Emergency Departments: A Needs Assessmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150401-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Advanced Practice Nurses in Emergency Departments: A Needs Assessment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rehwaldt, Maureen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mrehwaldt@ena.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Advanced practice nurses (APNs), particularly emergency nurse practitioners have been practicing in the emergency care setting for over 25 years. Since the education of APNs in emergency care varies depending on whether the program included a specific focus in emergency care, the educational needs of these nurses are not known. The purpose of this study was to identify the educational needs of this group in order to target a regional educational program for advanced practice nurses who work in emergency care settings. Design: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted. Sample and Setting: A convenience sample of 64 Advanced Practice Nurses attending an annual conference in a large metropolitan Midwestern city participated in the study. Name of Variables or Concepts: Advanced practice nurses, educational needs, nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist. Measures/Instruments: A 98 item advanced practice survey was designed for the study. The first 20 questions described demographic data, current practice area, years in nursing and years in emergency care. The second section of 14 items focused on interest in products (i.e., certification exam for nurse practitioner or clinical nurse specialist, self-study programs etc) and services (i.e., internet courses, regional conferences, etc). The last section of 64 items were forced choice questions listing possible educational needs and included clinical skills as well as advanced role classes. The survey was included in the registration packet of each nurse attending an annual conference. Participants were invited to participate and return the questionnaire to a designated area. Findings: The majority of respondents had state recognition as an advanced practice nurse. There were a total of 14 clinical nurse specialists and 35 nurse practitioners. Over one-half of the nurses attended a nurse practitioner program, one-fourth attended a clinical nurse specialist program and a small percentage (13%) graduated from a combined clinical nurse specialist-nurse practitioner program. One third of the clinical focus of the nurses&rsquo; education program was family (38%), followed by emergency care (33%), and critical care (19%). Most of the nurse practitioners were certified as family nurse practitioners (53%), worked in urban areas an average of 28.6 hours/week and worked in both main and fast track emergency departments. The priority educational needs of the nurse practitioners were dermatological conditions, advanced pharmacology, and orthopedic injuries and for the clinical nurse specialists, advanced pharmacology, laboratory interpretation, and applying research to practice. The priority skill labs chosen by the nurse practitioners were complex wound care and radiographic interpretation and for clinical nurse specialists, radiographic interpretation and 12/15 lead EKG. More clinical nurse specialists than nurse practitioners favored self-study programs (for advanced pharmacology, advanced physiology, certification exam, etc). Most APNs favored regional conferences for advanced practice nurses. Conclusions: Advanced practice nurses in emergency department settings have varied educational needs that include both clinical skills as well as educational content in specific areas. The information from this survey will help to design a regional conference that will include relevant skill labs and education on dermatological conditions, orthopediatric injuries, laboratory interpretation, and applying research to practice. Other educational programs can also be designed for local hospitals. Implications: This study has implications for hospitals and other health care settings who need to plan future programs for advanced practice nurses practicing in emergency care settings. Ongoing assessment of educational needs of APNs needs to continue in order to determine future conferences, and courses that will ensure quality emergency practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:36Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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