Comparison of Teaching Methodologies for Enhancing Critical Thinking (CT) Development in Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150402
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Teaching Methodologies for Enhancing Critical Thinking (CT) Development in Nursing Students
Abstract:
Comparison of Teaching Methodologies for Enhancing Critical Thinking (CT) Development in Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Croke, Eileen, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:California State University-Long Beach
Title:Assistant Professor
PURPOSE: of this study was to evaluate the effects of a combined teaching strategy (formalized classroom CT instruction and reflective journaling) over a singular methodology (formalized classroom CT instruction) for enhancing student’s patient care decision-making abilities over one academic semester. Two theoretical concepts guided this study: reflective thinking and lateral transference. DESIGN: of this study was descriptive action research with a comparative pre-posttest design. SAMPLE: sixty-eight first-semester nursing students enrolled in a four-year state university in So. Calif. comprised the convenience sample. The 68 students were divided into two groups: Group 1, an experimental group of 34 students; and Group 2, the control group. NAMES of VARIABLES: the dependent variables were the scores on two CT tests: the California Critical Thinking Skills test (CCTSI) and the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory test (CCTDI). The independent variables were the methodologies that included formalized classroom CT instruction and reflective journaling. MEASURES/INSTRUMENTS: Four research instruments were used in this study. One research instrument was a demographic sheet. Two of the instruments were the CCTSI and CCTDI and were used to measures students’ CT abilities. The fourth instrument was a clinical journal used to evaluate students practice care decision-making abilities. Students completed the pretests of the CCTSI and CCTDI during the first day of the academic semester and the posttest during the last week of the academic semester. Each week of the clinical semester, thirty-four students selected one clinical decision they had made in the course of their clinical day and recorded the decision with full details following seven questions established for the weekly reflective analysis. Over the ten week period, each student self-reflected on ten clinical decisions. Three hundred forty clinical decisions were analyzed. Results of the study were reported in quantitative and qualitative formats. FINDINGS: The matched t-test was used to analyze the CCTSI. In the experimental group, results showed no significant differences between pre/posttest scores, although positive increases were noted in the total mean score and subscales of evaluation, inference and inductive reasoning. In the control group, there were significant negative differences between pre/posttest scores in the total mean score and the subscales of evaluation and deductive reasoning. Positive increases were noted in the subscale scores of analysis, inference and inductive reasoning. The independent t-test was used to evaluate the pre/posttest scores for the experimental and control groups. No significant differences were noted. The t-test was used to analyze the CCTDI. Similar findings were noted between pre/posttest scores for each group on both subscale scores and the total mean score. The students reported that the reflective journal was extremely useful to them noting their development in clinical practice. They reported more confidence in clinical decision-making as they reflected upon past challenges and successes. Students believed they made progress because of increased knowledge, more experience and being able to work with experts. As students continued to practice they reported more application of prior clinical experience during clinical decision-making. Students learned to develop clinical plan using a combination of data resources. CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS: The literature supported nurse educators using a combination of methodologies rather than one method alone to monitor and evaluate students’ CT. By itself, formalized classroom instruction provided students with limited CT practice specific to the discipline—noted by a significant decrease in the total mean scale score. Teaching CT abilities based on the epistemology of the discipline has been shown to enhance CT development—noted by positive increases in the total mean score. For the CCTDI, results indicated similar findings for both groups. This could be attributed to the fact that dispositions are attitudes held by individuals and cannot be taught. In each group, there was a significant increase in the subscale score of truthseeking. Results of the study lend support for combined methodologies. Reflective journals provide an excellent method for instructors to monitor students’ progress in the practice care decision-making abilities. In evaluating the journals on a weekly basis, this educator was able to determine what was actually taking place on the clinical floor and in the minds of the novices. The journals indicated what knowledge was being applied accurately and what questions the novice had. Reading the journals also helped the educator understand the practice and needs of the student and identify with greater accuracy those strategies needed to guide students toward increased patient care clinical decision-making abilities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Teaching Methodologies for Enhancing Critical Thinking (CT) Development in Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150402-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Teaching Methodologies for Enhancing Critical Thinking (CT) Development in Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Croke, Eileen, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University-Long Beach</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ecroke@csulb.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: of this study was to evaluate the effects of a combined teaching strategy (formalized classroom CT instruction and reflective journaling) over a singular methodology (formalized classroom CT instruction) for enhancing student&rsquo;s patient care decision-making abilities over one academic semester. Two theoretical concepts guided this study: reflective thinking and lateral transference. DESIGN: of this study was descriptive action research with a comparative pre-posttest design. SAMPLE: sixty-eight first-semester nursing students enrolled in a four-year state university in So. Calif. comprised the convenience sample. The 68 students were divided into two groups: Group 1, an experimental group of 34 students; and Group 2, the control group. NAMES of VARIABLES: the dependent variables were the scores on two CT tests: the California Critical Thinking Skills test (CCTSI) and the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory test (CCTDI). The independent variables were the methodologies that included formalized classroom CT instruction and reflective journaling. MEASURES/INSTRUMENTS: Four research instruments were used in this study. One research instrument was a demographic sheet. Two of the instruments were the CCTSI and CCTDI and were used to measures students&rsquo; CT abilities. The fourth instrument was a clinical journal used to evaluate students practice care decision-making abilities. Students completed the pretests of the CCTSI and CCTDI during the first day of the academic semester and the posttest during the last week of the academic semester. Each week of the clinical semester, thirty-four students selected one clinical decision they had made in the course of their clinical day and recorded the decision with full details following seven questions established for the weekly reflective analysis. Over the ten week period, each student self-reflected on ten clinical decisions. Three hundred forty clinical decisions were analyzed. Results of the study were reported in quantitative and qualitative formats. FINDINGS: The matched t-test was used to analyze the CCTSI. In the experimental group, results showed no significant differences between pre/posttest scores, although positive increases were noted in the total mean score and subscales of evaluation, inference and inductive reasoning. In the control group, there were significant negative differences between pre/posttest scores in the total mean score and the subscales of evaluation and deductive reasoning. Positive increases were noted in the subscale scores of analysis, inference and inductive reasoning. The independent t-test was used to evaluate the pre/posttest scores for the experimental and control groups. No significant differences were noted. The t-test was used to analyze the CCTDI. Similar findings were noted between pre/posttest scores for each group on both subscale scores and the total mean score. The students reported that the reflective journal was extremely useful to them noting their development in clinical practice. They reported more confidence in clinical decision-making as they reflected upon past challenges and successes. Students believed they made progress because of increased knowledge, more experience and being able to work with experts. As students continued to practice they reported more application of prior clinical experience during clinical decision-making. Students learned to develop clinical plan using a combination of data resources. CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS: The literature supported nurse educators using a combination of methodologies rather than one method alone to monitor and evaluate students&rsquo; CT. By itself, formalized classroom instruction provided students with limited CT practice specific to the discipline&mdash;noted by a significant decrease in the total mean scale score. Teaching CT abilities based on the epistemology of the discipline has been shown to enhance CT development&mdash;noted by positive increases in the total mean score. For the CCTDI, results indicated similar findings for both groups. This could be attributed to the fact that dispositions are attitudes held by individuals and cannot be taught. In each group, there was a significant increase in the subscale score of truthseeking. Results of the study lend support for combined methodologies. Reflective journals provide an excellent method for instructors to monitor students&rsquo; progress in the practice care decision-making abilities. In evaluating the journals on a weekly basis, this educator was able to determine what was actually taking place on the clinical floor and in the minds of the novices. The journals indicated what knowledge was being applied accurately and what questions the novice had. Reading the journals also helped the educator understand the practice and needs of the student and identify with greater accuracy those strategies needed to guide students toward increased patient care clinical decision-making abilities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:37Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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