Lived Experiences of Native American Nurses: The Journey to Earn a Graduate Nursing Degree

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150404
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lived Experiences of Native American Nurses: The Journey to Earn a Graduate Nursing Degree
Abstract:
Lived Experiences of Native American Nurses: The Journey to Earn a Graduate Nursing Degree
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Gooden, Jodi
Although the total Native American population is 2.3 million, 0.9% of the total U.S. population, this is an under-represented group within the nursing profession with only 0.5% of the RN workforce being American Indian/Alaskan Native (Buerhaus & Auerbach, 1999; U.S. Census Bureau, 1997). The shortage of ethnic minority nurses in general and Native American Registered Nurses; in particular is well documented in the literature (Dickerson & Neary, 1999; Kavanagh, 1998). Nursing has been predominately a non-minority profession with 90% Caucasian and 10% minority in the U.S. (Yoder, 1996). The problem of under-representation of Native Americans in nursing compared to their representation in the general population leads to the question of why there are so few Native Americans nurses. Based on the personal contention that lack of educational success and a dearth of Native American nurse role models may be contributory factors, and that graduate nurses epitomize optimal role models, the question for this study evolved. The question for this study is: What are the lived experiences of the educational process of Native American Registered Nurses who have obtained graduate nursing degrees? The purpose of this study is to discover the meaning of and to understand the lived experiences of Native American Registered Nurses who have obtained graduate nursing degrees. The study's findings may assist educators to recruit Native Americans into nursing and help them succeed. The most appropriate method to answer the proposed question is the naturalistic method, specifically phenomenology, in which participants share their lived experiences, as they perceive them (Munhall, 1994). Generally, in qualitative studies the sample size is difficult to predict because it is not known at what point data saturation will be reached. It is anticipated that approximately 24 participants will be recruited for this study. The researcher will conduct two interviews with each participant. The first will be conducted in person the second will be in person or by telephone for the purpose of member checks. The data will be analyzed according to Colaizzi's method (1978). This analysis will include dwelling with the data until meaning emerges and an exhaustive description of the phenomenon develops. The study's findings will be disseminated via presentations, publications, and the dissertation report.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLived Experiences of Native American Nurses: The Journey to Earn a Graduate Nursing Degreeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150404-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Lived Experiences of Native American Nurses: The Journey to Earn a Graduate Nursing Degree</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gooden, Jodi</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jodigoo@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although the total Native American population is 2.3 million, 0.9% of the total U.S. population, this is an under-represented group within the nursing profession with only 0.5% of the RN workforce being American Indian/Alaskan Native (Buerhaus &amp; Auerbach, 1999; U.S. Census Bureau, 1997). The shortage of ethnic minority nurses in general and Native American Registered Nurses; in particular is well documented in the literature (Dickerson &amp; Neary, 1999; Kavanagh, 1998). Nursing has been predominately a non-minority profession with 90% Caucasian and 10% minority in the U.S. (Yoder, 1996). The problem of under-representation of Native Americans in nursing compared to their representation in the general population leads to the question of why there are so few Native Americans nurses. Based on the personal contention that lack of educational success and a dearth of Native American nurse role models may be contributory factors, and that graduate nurses epitomize optimal role models, the question for this study evolved. The question for this study is: What are the lived experiences of the educational process of Native American Registered Nurses who have obtained graduate nursing degrees? The purpose of this study is to discover the meaning of and to understand the lived experiences of Native American Registered Nurses who have obtained graduate nursing degrees. The study's findings may assist educators to recruit Native Americans into nursing and help them succeed. The most appropriate method to answer the proposed question is the naturalistic method, specifically phenomenology, in which participants share their lived experiences, as they perceive them (Munhall, 1994). Generally, in qualitative studies the sample size is difficult to predict because it is not known at what point data saturation will be reached. It is anticipated that approximately 24 participants will be recruited for this study. The researcher will conduct two interviews with each participant. The first will be conducted in person the second will be in person or by telephone for the purpose of member checks. The data will be analyzed according to Colaizzi's method (1978). This analysis will include dwelling with the data until meaning emerges and an exhaustive description of the phenomenon develops. The study's findings will be disseminated via presentations, publications, and the dissertation report.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:40Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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