Global Leadership through Distance Education: Formative Evaluation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150406
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Global Leadership through Distance Education: Formative Evaluation
Abstract:
Global Leadership through Distance Education: Formative Evaluation
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Tomey, Ann
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana State University
Objective: The purpose of this research was to identify faculty needs for converting courses to distance education so they could be met and distance education could be facilitated. Design: A funnel-based interview approach was used to do this descriptive qualitative research. Sample: Fifty-six faculty/staff who are using distance education teaching methods were interviewed. Setting: A Midwestern university. Names of concepts: distance education, television courses, and Internet courses. Measures/Instruments: A description of practice was done using a funnel-based interview. Findings: Transformation from traditional to television classes requires a period of adjustment. Faculties adjusted their presentations, testing strategies, and student presentations. Faculty members do not do much rethinking of their pedagogy, but they do learn that new strategies work. Transformation to Internet courses is more dramatic. It requires a sharp learning curve about the use of technology. The course needs to be very well organized and front loaded. Pedagogy needs to be adjusted. The innovators, the first faculty to put courses on IHETS and the Internet, were mainly self-taught, financially supported their own work, and felt resistance from colleagues and administrators. With the University’s commitment to distance education and the increased funding, most faculty are feeling well supported now. Faculty members are interested in reversing declining enrollments and expanding stable enrollments into new markets. Faculty members have done formative and summative evaluations as they have transformed their courses for distance education. Many faculty members are moving from traditional to television to videotapes to Internet. Most faculties interviewed are adding computer technology to their traditional as well as distance education courses. Some are adding more reflection and group activities. All faculties expressed concern about the amount of time it takes to transform a course. They need time to think about how to teach differently, time for the sharp learning curve required to use new technologies and strategies, and lots of time to front-load courses. They would like reassigned time to develop courses and then pay to teach them as a regular teaching load. Conclusions/Implications: Transformation of courses to Internet takes a sharper learning curve than transformation to television. Faculties need considerable time to think about how to teach differently, for the sharp learning course, and for developing courses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGlobal Leadership through Distance Education: Formative Evaluationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150406-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Global Leadership through Distance Education: Formative Evaluation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tomey, Ann</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nutomey@befac.indstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this research was to identify faculty needs for converting courses to distance education so they could be met and distance education could be facilitated. Design: A funnel-based interview approach was used to do this descriptive qualitative research. Sample: Fifty-six faculty/staff who are using distance education teaching methods were interviewed. Setting: A Midwestern university. Names of concepts: distance education, television courses, and Internet courses. Measures/Instruments: A description of practice was done using a funnel-based interview. Findings: Transformation from traditional to television classes requires a period of adjustment. Faculties adjusted their presentations, testing strategies, and student presentations. Faculty members do not do much rethinking of their pedagogy, but they do learn that new strategies work. Transformation to Internet courses is more dramatic. It requires a sharp learning curve about the use of technology. The course needs to be very well organized and front loaded. Pedagogy needs to be adjusted. The innovators, the first faculty to put courses on IHETS and the Internet, were mainly self-taught, financially supported their own work, and felt resistance from colleagues and administrators. With the University&rsquo;s commitment to distance education and the increased funding, most faculty are feeling well supported now. Faculty members are interested in reversing declining enrollments and expanding stable enrollments into new markets. Faculty members have done formative and summative evaluations as they have transformed their courses for distance education. Many faculty members are moving from traditional to television to videotapes to Internet. Most faculties interviewed are adding computer technology to their traditional as well as distance education courses. Some are adding more reflection and group activities. All faculties expressed concern about the amount of time it takes to transform a course. They need time to think about how to teach differently, time for the sharp learning curve required to use new technologies and strategies, and lots of time to front-load courses. They would like reassigned time to develop courses and then pay to teach them as a regular teaching load. Conclusions/Implications: Transformation of courses to Internet takes a sharper learning curve than transformation to television. Faculties need considerable time to think about how to teach differently, for the sharp learning course, and for developing courses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:43Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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