Reported Use of Complementary Therapies by Women with Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150408
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reported Use of Complementary Therapies by Women with Breast Cancer
Abstract:
Reported Use of Complementary Therapies by Women with Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Thibodaux, Julie
P.I. Institution Name:Northwest Arkansas Pediatric Clinic
The purpose of the study was to identify the patterns of use of complementary therapy in women with breast cancer. The information will provide clinicians with a better understanding of the patterns of use of complementary therapies by women with breast cancer. A systematic random sample of 166 women from the current list of clients of a breast cancer surgeon in a city in the Midwest were surveyed regarding their patterns of use and perceived effectiveness of therapies using the Complementary Therapy Rating Scale (CTRS) developed by Bennett and Lengacher (1998). Useable responses were received from 44% of the sample (n = 74). One hundred percent of respondents reported using at least one form of complementary therapy. This pattern of use is higher than previously reported in the literature. The most popular therapies differed from the original sample and included taking vitamins, using prayer for healing or pain relief and changing to a healthier diet. The least often reported therapies included hypnosis, acupuncture, and going to a chiropractor. Twenty-six percent of respondents reported never discussing their use of complementary therapies with their health care providers and 39% reported never being asked about their use of complementary therapies. Most users found chosen therapies to be very helpful. It is apparent that with such widespread use of complementary therapies health care providers need to initiate a discussion about use and effectiveness with their clients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReported Use of Complementary Therapies by Women with Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150408-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reported Use of Complementary Therapies by Women with Breast Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thibodaux, Julie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northwest Arkansas Pediatric Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jthibodaux@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of the study was to identify the patterns of use of complementary therapy in women with breast cancer. The information will provide clinicians with a better understanding of the patterns of use of complementary therapies by women with breast cancer. A systematic random sample of 166 women from the current list of clients of a breast cancer surgeon in a city in the Midwest were surveyed regarding their patterns of use and perceived effectiveness of therapies using the Complementary Therapy Rating Scale (CTRS) developed by Bennett and Lengacher (1998). Useable responses were received from 44% of the sample (n = 74). One hundred percent of respondents reported using at least one form of complementary therapy. This pattern of use is higher than previously reported in the literature. The most popular therapies differed from the original sample and included taking vitamins, using prayer for healing or pain relief and changing to a healthier diet. The least often reported therapies included hypnosis, acupuncture, and going to a chiropractor. Twenty-six percent of respondents reported never discussing their use of complementary therapies with their health care providers and 39% reported never being asked about their use of complementary therapies. Most users found chosen therapies to be very helpful. It is apparent that with such widespread use of complementary therapies health care providers need to initiate a discussion about use and effectiveness with their clients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:46Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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