Comparison of Pregnant Women's Nutritional Knowledge and Actual Dietary Intake

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150410
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Pregnant Women's Nutritional Knowledge and Actual Dietary Intake
Abstract:
Comparison of Pregnant Women's Nutritional Knowledge and Actual Dietary Intake
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Fowles, Eileen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Title:Adjunct Professor
Objective: The purpose of this research was to examine the relationships among women’s nutritional knowledge, adequacy of nutrition intake, and weight gain during pregnancy. The research questions were: 1) What do pregnant women know about general nutritional guidelines? 2) How does their actual dietary intake compare to nutritional requirements of pregnancy? 3) What are the differences between their knowledge and actual intake? and 4) What are the differences in nutritional knowledge, dietary intake and weight gain between low- and middle-income women. Design: A descriptive cross-sectional design. Sample: A convenience sample (N = 109) of middle- and low-income women. Setting: Childbirth education classes and prenatal clinic for low-income women. Variables/Instruments: Participants completed a demographic sheet, an instrument designed to assess knowledge of the Food Pyramid and a 24-hour dietary recall. Findings: The mean age of the women was 25 years, most were Caucasian (75%), primiparous (77%), in their third trimester (mean = 30.5 weeks gestation) with incomes ranging from < $10,000 to >$70,000. A significant difference was noted in total weight gain among the categories of prepregnant body mass index (BMI; F = 3.28, df = 3, p. = .02). Women with a low prepregnant BMI gained less weight than recommended by the IOM and women with high BMI gained more weight. Additionally, women attending the low-income prenatal clinic were proportionately either underweight or overweight compared to women enrolled from childbirth education classes. While most women (85%) reported familiarity with the Food Pyramid, few (10%) identified the number of servings in each food group. Additionally, dietary intake did not meet all the nutritional requirements of pregnancy; intake of vitamin D, folate, calcium, iron, and phosphorus were less than the RDA recommendations while intake of fat, vitamin A, and sodium were greater. Significant differences were noted between pregnant women's nutritional knowledge and actual dietary intake for breads (Z = -4.44, p. =. 000) and for fruits and vegetables (Z = -2.34, p. = .02) but not for meat and milk servings (Z = 2.39, p. NS). Women tended to eat more bread servings and fewer servings of fruits and vegetables. Women attending the prenatal clinic had more accurate knowledge of the recommended number of fruit and vegetable servings (X 2 = 12.52, df 3, p. < .00) and recommended number of meat and milk servings (X 2 = 25.67, df 3, p. < .00) but had significantly higher intake of bread (X 2 = 16.48, df 3, p. < .00) and meat and milk servings (X 2 = 13.05, df 3, p. < .00) than women in childbirth education classes. Conclusions: Pregnant women are unaware of normal nutritional requirements and do not consume foods that meet the nutritional requirements of pregnancy. Implications: Further research is needed to evaluate pregnant women's nutritional knowledge and actual dietary practices, to develop effective strategies to provide consistent individualized nutritional assessment and counseling during pregnancy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Pregnant Women's Nutritional Knowledge and Actual Dietary Intakeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150410-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Pregnant Women's Nutritional Knowledge and Actual Dietary Intake</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fowles, Eileen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adjunct Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">erfowle@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this research was to examine the relationships among women&rsquo;s nutritional knowledge, adequacy of nutrition intake, and weight gain during pregnancy. The research questions were: 1) What do pregnant women know about general nutritional guidelines? 2) How does their actual dietary intake compare to nutritional requirements of pregnancy? 3) What are the differences between their knowledge and actual intake? and 4) What are the differences in nutritional knowledge, dietary intake and weight gain between low- and middle-income women. Design: A descriptive cross-sectional design. Sample: A convenience sample (N = 109) of middle- and low-income women. Setting: Childbirth education classes and prenatal clinic for low-income women. Variables/Instruments: Participants completed a demographic sheet, an instrument designed to assess knowledge of the Food Pyramid and a 24-hour dietary recall. Findings: The mean age of the women was 25 years, most were Caucasian (75%), primiparous (77%), in their third trimester (mean = 30.5 weeks gestation) with incomes ranging from &lt; $10,000 to &gt;$70,000. A significant difference was noted in total weight gain among the categories of prepregnant body mass index (BMI; F = 3.28, df = 3, p. = .02). Women with a low prepregnant BMI gained less weight than recommended by the IOM and women with high BMI gained more weight. Additionally, women attending the low-income prenatal clinic were proportionately either underweight or overweight compared to women enrolled from childbirth education classes. While most women (85%) reported familiarity with the Food Pyramid, few (10%) identified the number of servings in each food group. Additionally, dietary intake did not meet all the nutritional requirements of pregnancy; intake of vitamin D, folate, calcium, iron, and phosphorus were less than the RDA recommendations while intake of fat, vitamin A, and sodium were greater. Significant differences were noted between pregnant women's nutritional knowledge and actual dietary intake for breads (Z = -4.44, p. =. 000) and for fruits and vegetables (Z = -2.34, p. = .02) but not for meat and milk servings (Z = 2.39, p. NS). Women tended to eat more bread servings and fewer servings of fruits and vegetables. Women attending the prenatal clinic had more accurate knowledge of the recommended number of fruit and vegetable servings (X 2 = 12.52, df 3, p. &lt; .00) and recommended number of meat and milk servings (X 2 = 25.67, df 3, p. &lt; .00) but had significantly higher intake of bread (X 2 = 16.48, df 3, p. &lt; .00) and meat and milk servings (X 2 = 13.05, df 3, p. &lt; .00) than women in childbirth education classes. Conclusions: Pregnant women are unaware of normal nutritional requirements and do not consume foods that meet the nutritional requirements of pregnancy. Implications: Further research is needed to evaluate pregnant women's nutritional knowledge and actual dietary practices, to develop effective strategies to provide consistent individualized nutritional assessment and counseling during pregnancy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:49Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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