2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150411
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Vitamin Supplementation in Pregnancy
Abstract:
Vitamin Supplementation in Pregnancy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Lindseth, Glenda
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Objective: Research indicates wide variations on the use of supplemental vitamin and mineral intakes by pregnant women. Some health care providers and pregnant women believe it is not necessary to take vitamin and mineral supplements during pregnancy and yet others feel it is necessary. A nutritious diet with adequate intakes of nutrients such as folic acid during pregnancy have been associated with optimal prenatal outcomes (Czeizel, 1998). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the frequency pregnant women consumed multivitamin supplements and to further analyze this factor for relationships to related variables. Design: This is an ongoing descriptive-correlational study of 132 northern plains Native American and Caucasian pregnant women studied at 14 and 26 weeks of gestation. Orem’s Theory of self-Care guided this prospective study. Setting: Consenting 18 to 38 year-old pregnant women were systematically entered into the study after referral by primary health care providers in five Midwestern, prenatal clinics. Variables: Differences between the numbers of women who consumed multivitamin supplements and those who did not take multivitamin supplements during pregnancy were compared using nonparametric statistics. The variables age, parity, weeks of gestation, body mass index (BMI), self care agency and nausea and vomiting in pregnancy for women who took multi-vitamin supplement intakes were compared to women who did not by using t-test statistics. Regression analyses were calculated to determine relationships. Measures/Instruments: Instruments used for measures included Block’s adapted Health Habit’s Questionnaire (a=.67) to analyze supplemental and nutrient intake data, “Rhode’s Nausea and Vomiting Symptom Distress Scale (a=.88) to measure “morning sickness”, and Kearney and Fleischer’s Exercise of Self-care Agency (a=.80. Findings: Sixty-eight percent of the women in this study took multivitamin supplements with minerals in early pregnancy (at 14 weeks), and 32% took a supplement in late pregnancy (26-30 weeks). There were significant differences (p = < .05) between those women who did not take multivitamin supplements as compared to those that did take multivitamins in early and late pregnancy. Results also indicate that women who took no multivitamin supplements in early pregnancy were more likely (t = 2.0, df = 113, p = .05) to experience nausea and vomiting distress than those who consumed multivitamin supplements. Conclusions: Northern plains women decreased consumption of multivitamin supplements as their pregnancies progressed, although factors such as “morning sickness” distress was experienced less by women who took a multivitamin supplement early in pregnancy. Implications: With nearly two thirds of the women choosing not to take multivitamin supplements as they progress into late pregnancy, nurses need to be aware and encourage pregnant women to eat a nutritious diet so they will not miss essential nutrients that are so important to their pregnancy. Nurses also need to be aware of prenatal factors that may affect multi-vitamin consumption in early and late pregnancy so they can facilitate positive pregnancy outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVitamin Supplementation in Pregnancyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150411-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Vitamin Supplementation in Pregnancy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lindseth, Glenda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">glenda_lindseth@mail.und.nodak</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Research indicates wide variations on the use of supplemental vitamin and mineral intakes by pregnant women. Some health care providers and pregnant women believe it is not necessary to take vitamin and mineral supplements during pregnancy and yet others feel it is necessary. A nutritious diet with adequate intakes of nutrients such as folic acid during pregnancy have been associated with optimal prenatal outcomes (Czeizel, 1998). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the frequency pregnant women consumed multivitamin supplements and to further analyze this factor for relationships to related variables. Design: This is an ongoing descriptive-correlational study of 132 northern plains Native American and Caucasian pregnant women studied at 14 and 26 weeks of gestation. Orem&rsquo;s Theory of self-Care guided this prospective study. Setting: Consenting 18 to 38 year-old pregnant women were systematically entered into the study after referral by primary health care providers in five Midwestern, prenatal clinics. Variables: Differences between the numbers of women who consumed multivitamin supplements and those who did not take multivitamin supplements during pregnancy were compared using nonparametric statistics. The variables age, parity, weeks of gestation, body mass index (BMI), self care agency and nausea and vomiting in pregnancy for women who took multi-vitamin supplement intakes were compared to women who did not by using t-test statistics. Regression analyses were calculated to determine relationships. Measures/Instruments: Instruments used for measures included Block&rsquo;s adapted Health Habit&rsquo;s Questionnaire (a=.67) to analyze supplemental and nutrient intake data, &ldquo;Rhode&rsquo;s Nausea and Vomiting Symptom Distress Scale (a=.88) to measure &ldquo;morning sickness&rdquo;, and Kearney and Fleischer&rsquo;s Exercise of Self-care Agency (a=.80. Findings: Sixty-eight percent of the women in this study took multivitamin supplements with minerals in early pregnancy (at 14 weeks), and 32% took a supplement in late pregnancy (26-30 weeks). There were significant differences (p = &lt; .05) between those women who did not take multivitamin supplements as compared to those that did take multivitamins in early and late pregnancy. Results also indicate that women who took no multivitamin supplements in early pregnancy were more likely (t = 2.0, df = 113, p = .05) to experience nausea and vomiting distress than those who consumed multivitamin supplements. Conclusions: Northern plains women decreased consumption of multivitamin supplements as their pregnancies progressed, although factors such as &ldquo;morning sickness&rdquo; distress was experienced less by women who took a multivitamin supplement early in pregnancy. Implications: With nearly two thirds of the women choosing not to take multivitamin supplements as they progress into late pregnancy, nurses need to be aware and encourage pregnant women to eat a nutritious diet so they will not miss essential nutrients that are so important to their pregnancy. Nurses also need to be aware of prenatal factors that may affect multi-vitamin consumption in early and late pregnancy so they can facilitate positive pregnancy outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:23:50Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:23:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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