2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150419
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dying Well: The Contribution of Advance Directives
Abstract:
Dying Well: The Contribution of Advance Directives
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Godkin, M.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alberta
Title:Faculty of Nursing
In 1997, legislation supporting the use of advance directives (Personal Directives Act) was enacted in Alberta. Through advance directives, individuals are able to make choices about the types of treatment and care they want to receive in future situations of incapacity. There is a substantial discrepancy between the large number of individuals who support the concept of advance directives and the low number who actually complete one. A number of barriers to completion have been discussed in the literature, but they do not seem to adequately account for the level of divergence. We have limited knowledge and understanding about the experience of preparing an advance directive and how it may or may not contribute to "dying well." In this interpretive inquiry, the older adult's experience of preparing an advance directive is explored. The purpose is to produce an evocative text--one that authentically describes and interprets the lived experience of an older adult's preparation of an advance directive in a way that informs the reader (health care provider) and inspires appropriate ethical action. Participants are 65 years or older, have completed an advance directive, are able to speak and understand English, and are willing and able to articulate their experience of preparing a directive. Participants were recruited by word of mouth and through postings on bulletin boards at community locations such as senior's centres. Several organizations, including the Office of the Public Guardian, distributed information about the study. After completing an informed consent process, participants took part in an unstructured and conversational interview with the investigator. The primary source of data is transcripts of audio-taped personal interviews. The advance directive documents prepared by the participant, as well as literature, movies, and art exploring the themes of advance care planning for end-of-life and dying well, are also used as sources of data. As it is collected, textual data is analyzed by the researcher immersing herself in the data and engaging in processes of reflection, questioning, clarifying, and writing. Preliminary findings from the data are presented in this poster. The generation of practical, personal, and ethical knowledge through this inquiry may facilitate nurse-patient interactions with older adults around end-of-life care and help them to achieve the goal of dying well. As death is a certainty for us all, personal knowledge about making end-of-life decisions has additional relevance for the researcher and readers of the interpretive writing that results from the study.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDying Well: The Contribution of Advance Directivesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150419-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dying Well: The Contribution of Advance Directives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Godkin, M.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alberta</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Faculty of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dgodkin@ualberta.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In 1997, legislation supporting the use of advance directives (Personal Directives Act) was enacted in Alberta. Through advance directives, individuals are able to make choices about the types of treatment and care they want to receive in future situations of incapacity. There is a substantial discrepancy between the large number of individuals who support the concept of advance directives and the low number who actually complete one. A number of barriers to completion have been discussed in the literature, but they do not seem to adequately account for the level of divergence. We have limited knowledge and understanding about the experience of preparing an advance directive and how it may or may not contribute to &quot;dying well.&quot; In this interpretive inquiry, the older adult's experience of preparing an advance directive is explored. The purpose is to produce an evocative text--one that authentically describes and interprets the lived experience of an older adult's preparation of an advance directive in a way that informs the reader (health care provider) and inspires appropriate ethical action. Participants are 65 years or older, have completed an advance directive, are able to speak and understand English, and are willing and able to articulate their experience of preparing a directive. Participants were recruited by word of mouth and through postings on bulletin boards at community locations such as senior's centres. Several organizations, including the Office of the Public Guardian, distributed information about the study. After completing an informed consent process, participants took part in an unstructured and conversational interview with the investigator. The primary source of data is transcripts of audio-taped personal interviews. The advance directive documents prepared by the participant, as well as literature, movies, and art exploring the themes of advance care planning for end-of-life and dying well, are also used as sources of data. As it is collected, textual data is analyzed by the researcher immersing herself in the data and engaging in processes of reflection, questioning, clarifying, and writing. Preliminary findings from the data are presented in this poster. The generation of practical, personal, and ethical knowledge through this inquiry may facilitate nurse-patient interactions with older adults around end-of-life care and help them to achieve the goal of dying well. As death is a certainty for us all, personal knowledge about making end-of-life decisions has additional relevance for the researcher and readers of the interpretive writing that results from the study.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:24:02Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:24:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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