Attitudes of Hispanic Migrant Farmworkers with Diabetes in Relation to Their Self-Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150421
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attitudes of Hispanic Migrant Farmworkers with Diabetes in Relation to Their Self-Care
Abstract:
Attitudes of Hispanic Migrant Farmworkers with Diabetes in Relation to Their Self-Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Hofer, Krista
P.I. Institution Name:Migrant Health Services, Inc. Diabetes Program
Objective: Diabetes is a major health problem among Hispanic Americans, yet the impact of migrant farmworkers’ attitudes related to diabetes self-care has not been fully examined. The purpose of this study was to describe the attitudes of Hispanic migrant farmworkers with diabetes in relation to their self-care. Theoretical/Conceptual framework: Pender’s Health Promotional Model guided this study. Methodology: A descriptive, quantitative design. The instrument used for measures was the English/Spanish Diabetes Attitudes and Behaviors Questionnaire. Sample: The participants and target population were migrant farmworkers with diabetes. The convenience sample consists of 127 migrant farmworkers who received care at one of the eleven Migrant Health seasonal nurse-managed clinics, located in the upper Midwest. Data collection took place over a 4 month period. Results: Attitudes towards calorie management were mixed, with more than 90 percent of the participants agreeing to the importance of a good diet and drinking habits. However, 95 (75.4%) believed it was hard to eat regular meals and 73 (59.3%) did not agree to the importance of regular exercise. Over 90 percent agreed to the importance of diabetic care such as monitoring blood sugars, monitoring HbA1c and checking feet. Annual eye exams and cholesterol checks were also thought important by over 90%. However, checking blood pressure was important to only 74 (59.2%) and regular trips to the dentist by 64 (51.6%). The majority did not believe that urine tests (n=89, 71.2%) and annual flu shots (n=66, 52.4%) were important to their diabetes care. Conclusions: Findings indicate that migrant farmworkers know how to monitor their diabetes on a day-to-day basis but there is a lack of comprehension about the standards of care and how complications relate to long-term management. Implications: Findings will assist health care providers in tailoring diabetes educational interventions and the provision of culturally competent care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttitudes of Hispanic Migrant Farmworkers with Diabetes in Relation to Their Self-Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150421-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attitudes of Hispanic Migrant Farmworkers with Diabetes in Relation to Their Self-Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hofer, Krista</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Migrant Health Services, Inc. Diabetes Program</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">krista_hofer@und.nodak.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Diabetes is a major health problem among Hispanic Americans, yet the impact of migrant farmworkers&rsquo; attitudes related to diabetes self-care has not been fully examined. The purpose of this study was to describe the attitudes of Hispanic migrant farmworkers with diabetes in relation to their self-care. Theoretical/Conceptual framework: Pender&rsquo;s Health Promotional Model guided this study. Methodology: A descriptive, quantitative design. The instrument used for measures was the English/Spanish Diabetes Attitudes and Behaviors Questionnaire. Sample: The participants and target population were migrant farmworkers with diabetes. The convenience sample consists of 127 migrant farmworkers who received care at one of the eleven Migrant Health seasonal nurse-managed clinics, located in the upper Midwest. Data collection took place over a 4 month period. Results: Attitudes towards calorie management were mixed, with more than 90 percent of the participants agreeing to the importance of a good diet and drinking habits. However, 95 (75.4%) believed it was hard to eat regular meals and 73 (59.3%) did not agree to the importance of regular exercise. Over 90 percent agreed to the importance of diabetic care such as monitoring blood sugars, monitoring HbA1c and checking feet. Annual eye exams and cholesterol checks were also thought important by over 90%. However, checking blood pressure was important to only 74 (59.2%) and regular trips to the dentist by 64 (51.6%). The majority did not believe that urine tests (n=89, 71.2%) and annual flu shots (n=66, 52.4%) were important to their diabetes care. Conclusions: Findings indicate that migrant farmworkers know how to monitor their diabetes on a day-to-day basis but there is a lack of comprehension about the standards of care and how complications relate to long-term management. Implications: Findings will assist health care providers in tailoring diabetes educational interventions and the provision of culturally competent care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:24:05Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:24:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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