2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150425
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Model of Health, Vulnerability and Adaptation
Abstract:
A Model of Health, Vulnerability and Adaptation
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:McMillan, Diana
P.I. Institution Name:University of Manitoba
Objective: To describe a holistic model of health, that provides nurses with a schema conceptualizing the environment and its integral relationship to the individual, health, vulnerability and adaptation. The model was developed to illustrate clinical and research observations in acute and chronic illness, and coping behavior not adequately depicted by current theoretical schema. Design: The model is based on a synthesis of theoretical and research literature and clinical observations focused in health, vulnerability, and adaptation. This method of model generation is consistent with the inductive approach of concept clarification (Lackey, 1993; Norris, 1982). A key factor in model development was the aim to integrate both an ecological systems perspective and an individual systems level understanding. Sample: The model was developed from a review of the scholarly literature in a variety of disciplines including nursing, medicine, psychology, physiology, and sociology. Sources included searches from CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, and additional library resources. Other sources included clinical and research observations by the author with expertise in chronic and acute pain, stress, sleep, and coping behaviors. Setting: Model components are explored and described within the framework of four central concepts to nursing science, namely, client, nursing, environment, and health (Fawcett, 1978). Names of Variables or Concepts: Key model concepts include health, environment, individual, vulnerability, adaptation, adaptive capacity, system level, resources, and demands. Measures/Instruments: Not applicable. Findings: Current environmental and adaptation models do not adequately provide an integrated, multi system schema for health, vulnerability and adaptation. The proposed model extends the work by Bronfenbrenner (1989), by the addition of an intrasystem dimension, and the integration and schematic representation of the concepts health and vulnerability. The model is particularly significant for the development and integration of four explanatory pathways of adaptation. Conclusions: The Health, Vulnerability and Adaptation Model visually and holistically captures a number of complex clinical practice and research observations centered on health, adaptation and the environment. The model appears congruent with adaptive and maladaptive behavior observations cited in the literature and found clinically. The model provides a basic measure of prediction for adaptive capacity and system level vulnerability, and is helpful for explaining the relationship of vulnerability to health status, and system resources and demands. Additional research and clinical observation will enhance validity testing of the model, aid in identification of system level resources and demands, and expand applicability, generalizability and usefulness for practice, research, and theory development. Implications: The proposed model has implications for both research and clinical practice by providing a basic guide for nursing intervention at multiple system levels. The schema is useful for assisting in the prioritizing of adaptation-related interventions at the system level and for expanding our focus of health and health factors to include the individual, in addition to higher order systems such as the family, workplace, community, sociocultural and political milieus, and the global physical environment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Model of Health, Vulnerability and Adaptationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150425-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Model of Health, Vulnerability and Adaptation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McMillan, Diana</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Manitoba</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">diana_mcmillan@umanitoba.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To describe a holistic model of health, that provides nurses with a schema conceptualizing the environment and its integral relationship to the individual, health, vulnerability and adaptation. The model was developed to illustrate clinical and research observations in acute and chronic illness, and coping behavior not adequately depicted by current theoretical schema. Design: The model is based on a synthesis of theoretical and research literature and clinical observations focused in health, vulnerability, and adaptation. This method of model generation is consistent with the inductive approach of concept clarification (Lackey, 1993; Norris, 1982). A key factor in model development was the aim to integrate both an ecological systems perspective and an individual systems level understanding. Sample: The model was developed from a review of the scholarly literature in a variety of disciplines including nursing, medicine, psychology, physiology, and sociology. Sources included searches from CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, and additional library resources. Other sources included clinical and research observations by the author with expertise in chronic and acute pain, stress, sleep, and coping behaviors. Setting: Model components are explored and described within the framework of four central concepts to nursing science, namely, client, nursing, environment, and health (Fawcett, 1978). Names of Variables or Concepts: Key model concepts include health, environment, individual, vulnerability, adaptation, adaptive capacity, system level, resources, and demands. Measures/Instruments: Not applicable. Findings: Current environmental and adaptation models do not adequately provide an integrated, multi system schema for health, vulnerability and adaptation. The proposed model extends the work by Bronfenbrenner (1989), by the addition of an intrasystem dimension, and the integration and schematic representation of the concepts health and vulnerability. The model is particularly significant for the development and integration of four explanatory pathways of adaptation. Conclusions: The Health, Vulnerability and Adaptation Model visually and holistically captures a number of complex clinical practice and research observations centered on health, adaptation and the environment. The model appears congruent with adaptive and maladaptive behavior observations cited in the literature and found clinically. The model provides a basic measure of prediction for adaptive capacity and system level vulnerability, and is helpful for explaining the relationship of vulnerability to health status, and system resources and demands. Additional research and clinical observation will enhance validity testing of the model, aid in identification of system level resources and demands, and expand applicability, generalizability and usefulness for practice, research, and theory development. Implications: The proposed model has implications for both research and clinical practice by providing a basic guide for nursing intervention at multiple system levels. The schema is useful for assisting in the prioritizing of adaptation-related interventions at the system level and for expanding our focus of health and health factors to include the individual, in addition to higher order systems such as the family, workplace, community, sociocultural and political milieus, and the global physical environment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:24:11Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:24:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.