Korean and US Family and Staff Caregivers’ Perceptions of Care in Dementia Care Units

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150427
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Korean and US Family and Staff Caregivers’ Perceptions of Care in Dementia Care Units
Abstract:
Korean and US Family and Staff Caregivers’ Perceptions of Care in Dementia Care Units
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Park, Myonghwa
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
With the demanding level of care needed for people with dementia, more Korean families are institutionalizing their relatives, as in the United States. This presents particular concern for the Korean culture that values family responsibility for elder care. Based on the theoretical framework of person-environment fit and role theory, the purposes of this study were to describe Korean and US family and staff members’ perceptions of stress and satisfaction with care, caregiving role, family-staff relationships, family involvement in care, and similarities and differences in the perceptions of care, caregiving role, and family-staff relationships for the two groups. A purposive sample of 94 family members and 112 staff members in 10 long-term dementia care facilities in Korea participated in the study. Self-administered questionnaires for quantitative data and semi-structured interview for qualitative data were used. Cross-cultural differences were examined from both quantitative and qualitative perspectives using US baseline date from Family Involvement in Care (FIC) intervention study (Maas et al., 2000). Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, General Linear Model (GLM), Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA), and t-tests using the SPSS program for quantitative data, and the NUD*IST vivo qualitative data analysis program for qualitative data. Findings from the study can be summarized as follows: (a) Korean family caregivers were statistically significantly less satisfied with the care of their institutionalized relatives with dementia, (b) Korean family members felt more stress associated with an institutionalized relative with dementia, (c) Korean staff members felt more stress related to caring for residents with dementia, (d) Korean staff members were less satisfied with their jobs and had more negative attitudes about family members of the patients with dementia, and (e) The six patterns (feeling exhausted, deep sorrow, fractured relationships, apprehension, searching for connectedness, and entrusting) describe Korean family members’ experiences related to placement of their relatives with dementia. This cross-cultural study analyzed the caregiving experiences in two different cultural contexts. The results contribute to the understanding of Korean and US family and staff members’ perceptions of caregiving and the care relationship after institutionalizing elderly persons with dementia.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKorean and US Family and Staff Caregivers’ Perceptions of Care in Dementia Care Unitsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150427-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Korean and US Family and Staff Caregivers&rsquo; Perceptions of Care in Dementia Care Units</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Park, Myonghwa</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">myonghwa-park@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">With the demanding level of care needed for people with dementia, more Korean families are institutionalizing their relatives, as in the United States. This presents particular concern for the Korean culture that values family responsibility for elder care. Based on the theoretical framework of person-environment fit and role theory, the purposes of this study were to describe Korean and US family and staff members&rsquo; perceptions of stress and satisfaction with care, caregiving role, family-staff relationships, family involvement in care, and similarities and differences in the perceptions of care, caregiving role, and family-staff relationships for the two groups. A purposive sample of 94 family members and 112 staff members in 10 long-term dementia care facilities in Korea participated in the study. Self-administered questionnaires for quantitative data and semi-structured interview for qualitative data were used. Cross-cultural differences were examined from both quantitative and qualitative perspectives using US baseline date from Family Involvement in Care (FIC) intervention study (Maas et al., 2000). Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, General Linear Model (GLM), Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA), and t-tests using the SPSS program for quantitative data, and the NUD*IST vivo qualitative data analysis program for qualitative data. Findings from the study can be summarized as follows: (a) Korean family caregivers were statistically significantly less satisfied with the care of their institutionalized relatives with dementia, (b) Korean family members felt more stress associated with an institutionalized relative with dementia, (c) Korean staff members felt more stress related to caring for residents with dementia, (d) Korean staff members were less satisfied with their jobs and had more negative attitudes about family members of the patients with dementia, and (e) The six patterns (feeling exhausted, deep sorrow, fractured relationships, apprehension, searching for connectedness, and entrusting) describe Korean family members&rsquo; experiences related to placement of their relatives with dementia. This cross-cultural study analyzed the caregiving experiences in two different cultural contexts. The results contribute to the understanding of Korean and US family and staff members&rsquo; perceptions of caregiving and the care relationship after institutionalizing elderly persons with dementia.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:24:13Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:24:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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