2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150428
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perception of caring behaviors in health care environments
Abstract:
Perception of caring behaviors in health care environments
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Pietraniec, Richard
P.I. Institution Name:Toledo Hospital
Care is identified as an essential concept in healthcare environments, yet one that has been difficult for providers and administrators to define. The study identified nurse caring behaviors perceived as most important by patients, nurses, and administrators. Seventy-five patients, nurses, and administrators in a large, Midwestern, metropolitan, tertiary care facility were invited to participate in the study. Watson’s Theory of Caring (1979) was used as the conceptual framework that guided the study. Larson’s Caring Assessment Instrument (CARE-Q) was used for data collection. Forty-three patients, fifty nurses, and thirty-one administrators completed the CARE-Q instrument. Data analysis using descriptive statistics yielded frequency counts and cumulative percentages. The findings demonstrated that while patients identified the physical aspects of care to be most important, registered nurses and administrators identified affective or expressive aspects as most important. Utilizing the study’s findings, patient care administrators have an opportunity to better understand and improve current healthcare environments.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerception of caring behaviors in health care environmentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150428-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perception of caring behaviors in health care environments</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pietraniec, Richard</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Toledo Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">richard.pietraniec@promedica.o</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Care is identified as an essential concept in healthcare environments, yet one that has been difficult for providers and administrators to define. The study identified nurse caring behaviors perceived as most important by patients, nurses, and administrators. Seventy-five patients, nurses, and administrators in a large, Midwestern, metropolitan, tertiary care facility were invited to participate in the study. Watson&rsquo;s Theory of Caring (1979) was used as the conceptual framework that guided the study. Larson&rsquo;s Caring Assessment Instrument (CARE-Q) was used for data collection. Forty-three patients, fifty nurses, and thirty-one administrators completed the CARE-Q instrument. Data analysis using descriptive statistics yielded frequency counts and cumulative percentages. The findings demonstrated that while patients identified the physical aspects of care to be most important, registered nurses and administrators identified affective or expressive aspects as most important. Utilizing the study&rsquo;s findings, patient care administrators have an opportunity to better understand and improve current healthcare environments.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:24:15Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:24:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.