Bedside Placement Of Small Bowel Feeding Tubes In The Intensive Care Unit

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150438
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bedside Placement Of Small Bowel Feeding Tubes In The Intensive Care Unit
Abstract:
Bedside Placement Of Small Bowel Feeding Tubes In The Intensive Care Unit
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Powers, Jan
P.I. Institution Name:Methodist Hospital, Clarian Health Partners of Indiana
Purpose: To provide timely, cost effective placement of small bowel feeding tubes by nurses at the bedside. Studies have verified the benefits of early enteral nutrition in critically ill patients. Timely initiation limits bacterial translocation, enhances nutritional stores and diminishes the cost and complications associated with malnutrition. Timely, cost effective placement of feeding tubes in the small bowel is challenging. In our institution, once patients have a physician order for placement, they are transported to radiology for fluoroscopy or incur the cost of bedside fluoroscopy. These procedures require the availability of a procedure room and the attendance of a radiologist and/or technician, which has delayed placement for up to 4 days. The nutrition support team (NST) implemented a modified protocol, which enables placement without fluoroscopy, by a nurse at the bedside. Using a modified technique previously described by Zaloga et al, three nurses, 2 advanced practice nurses, and a care coordinator, were taught by a NST physician to place the feeding tubes via air auscultation. This technique involved patient positioning, guidewire manipulation, and the confirmation of placement by physical exam and an abdominal flat plate. Over a 12 month period, 333 feeding tubes were placed with a 95% success rate. All procedures were begun within a mean of 1 hour (range 5 minutes to 3 hours) with a mean procedure duration of 24 minutes (range 0 to 5 hours). Efforts are underway to measure cost savings in terms of professional fees, radiology expenses, and nursing time.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBedside Placement Of Small Bowel Feeding Tubes In The Intensive Care Uniten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150438-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Bedside Placement Of Small Bowel Feeding Tubes In The Intensive Care Unit</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Powers, Jan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Methodist Hospital, Clarian Health Partners of Indiana</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To provide timely, cost effective placement of small bowel feeding tubes by nurses at the bedside. Studies have verified the benefits of early enteral nutrition in critically ill patients. Timely initiation limits bacterial translocation, enhances nutritional stores and diminishes the cost and complications associated with malnutrition. Timely, cost effective placement of feeding tubes in the small bowel is challenging. In our institution, once patients have a physician order for placement, they are transported to radiology for fluoroscopy or incur the cost of bedside fluoroscopy. These procedures require the availability of a procedure room and the attendance of a radiologist and/or technician, which has delayed placement for up to 4 days. The nutrition support team (NST) implemented a modified protocol, which enables placement without fluoroscopy, by a nurse at the bedside. Using a modified technique previously described by Zaloga et al, three nurses, 2 advanced practice nurses, and a care coordinator, were taught by a NST physician to place the feeding tubes via air auscultation. This technique involved patient positioning, guidewire manipulation, and the confirmation of placement by physical exam and an abdominal flat plate. Over a 12 month period, 333 feeding tubes were placed with a 95% success rate. All procedures were begun within a mean of 1 hour (range 5 minutes to 3 hours) with a mean procedure duration of 24 minutes (range 0 to 5 hours). Efforts are underway to measure cost savings in terms of professional fees, radiology expenses, and nursing time.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:24:30Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:24:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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