Evaluation of a Long Term Care Workforce Initiative Training Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150442
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of a Long Term Care Workforce Initiative Training Program
Abstract:
Evaluation of a Long Term Care Workforce Initiative Training Program
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Hollinger-Smith, Linda
P.I. Institution Name:Mather LifeWays/Mather Institute on Aging
The need to train, recruit and retain qualified health care professionals and paraprofessionals in long term care (LTC) is escalating with the growth of an aging population. A LTC workforce crisis is expected to spread over the next two decades due to factors such as competition for the same worker pool, an aging RN workforce, lack of adequate staff training, and increased acuity of LTC facility residents. The purpose of this evaluation study is to examine the impact of a LTC Workforce Initiative Training Program, entitled, "LEAP for a 21st Century LTC Workforce", on outcome variables of LTC nursing staff. The presentation describes the evaluation of implementing the first sector of LEAP, the "Frontline Nurse Leadership Sector". The Frontline Nurse Leadership Sector is a six-week interactive program to prepare LTC nurse leaders with the skills and tools to effect positive change and development in the LTC environment. The program is structured according to the LEAP acronym: (1) LEARN to use tools and resources for quality LTC; (2) EMPOWER staff to provide person-centered care for LTC residents; (3) ACHIEVE commitment to work teams and the organization; and (4) PRODUCE opportunities for growth and development. Content of the program includes: (1) developing the nurse leader role in LTC; (2) effective communication and listening; (3) giving constructive feedback; (4) dealing with emotional behavior; and (5) delegating to staff. A repeated measures design examined differences among RNs, LPNs, and CNAs (n=190) over an 8-month period in a LTC facility. Levels of work effectiveness and retention of LTC staff were significantly associated (p<0.01) with supervisor's leadership behaviors, organizational support, degree of job stress, resource accessibility and job satisfaction. Six of eight components of job satisfaction significantly increased 6-months after completion of the program (p<0.007). These included: relationship with supervisors, recognition or rewards, communication, operations, job benefits, and opportunity for promotion and development. Discriminant analyses examined factors that characterized highly effective nurse leaders. LTC nurses perceived as highly effective leaders provided staff greater access to information, resources, and support to carry out their work. Staff who work with highly effective nurse leaders has significantly (1) greater positive perceptions of the organizational climate; (2) higher perceptions of their own work effectiveness; (3) less job stress; and (4) greater job satisfaction. Developing effective nurse leaders and empowering staff in LTC are key to improving job satisfaction and creating a positive work environment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of a Long Term Care Workforce Initiative Training Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150442-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of a Long Term Care Workforce Initiative Training Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hollinger-Smith, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mather LifeWays/Mather Institute on Aging</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lhollingersmith@matherlifeways</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The need to train, recruit and retain qualified health care professionals and paraprofessionals in long term care (LTC) is escalating with the growth of an aging population. A LTC workforce crisis is expected to spread over the next two decades due to factors such as competition for the same worker pool, an aging RN workforce, lack of adequate staff training, and increased acuity of LTC facility residents. The purpose of this evaluation study is to examine the impact of a LTC Workforce Initiative Training Program, entitled, &quot;LEAP for a 21st Century LTC Workforce&quot;, on outcome variables of LTC nursing staff. The presentation describes the evaluation of implementing the first sector of LEAP, the &quot;Frontline Nurse Leadership Sector&quot;. The Frontline Nurse Leadership Sector is a six-week interactive program to prepare LTC nurse leaders with the skills and tools to effect positive change and development in the LTC environment. The program is structured according to the LEAP acronym: (1) LEARN to use tools and resources for quality LTC; (2) EMPOWER staff to provide person-centered care for LTC residents; (3) ACHIEVE commitment to work teams and the organization; and (4) PRODUCE opportunities for growth and development. Content of the program includes: (1) developing the nurse leader role in LTC; (2) effective communication and listening; (3) giving constructive feedback; (4) dealing with emotional behavior; and (5) delegating to staff. A repeated measures design examined differences among RNs, LPNs, and CNAs (n=190) over an 8-month period in a LTC facility. Levels of work effectiveness and retention of LTC staff were significantly associated (p&lt;0.01) with supervisor's leadership behaviors, organizational support, degree of job stress, resource accessibility and job satisfaction. Six of eight components of job satisfaction significantly increased 6-months after completion of the program (p&lt;0.007). These included: relationship with supervisors, recognition or rewards, communication, operations, job benefits, and opportunity for promotion and development. Discriminant analyses examined factors that characterized highly effective nurse leaders. LTC nurses perceived as highly effective leaders provided staff greater access to information, resources, and support to carry out their work. Staff who work with highly effective nurse leaders has significantly (1) greater positive perceptions of the organizational climate; (2) higher perceptions of their own work effectiveness; (3) less job stress; and (4) greater job satisfaction. Developing effective nurse leaders and empowering staff in LTC are key to improving job satisfaction and creating a positive work environment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:24:35Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:24:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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