2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150530
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Biological and Physiological Response to Caregiver Burden
Abstract:
The Biological and Physiological Response to Caregiver Burden
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Clark, Michele C., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada in Las Vegas
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Hoang Thanh Nguyen, PhD; Carolyn Leach, MSN, CNP, RN
21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: When dormant vulnerabilities (personality factors sociotropy and autonomy) are activated by a stressor (caregiver burden), these personality factors become mediators to caregiver depression. However, these personality factors have not been examined in relation to physiological biomarkers. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether personality factors influence caregivers' levels of proinflammatory mediators when high levels of caregiver burden are present. Methods: A cross-sectional convenience sample (n = 106) of primarily female (55%) caregivers completed questionnaires for depression, burden, and personality factors. Serum levels of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were also evaluated. The relationship between personality factors and proinflammatory mediator levels was modeled using logistic regression using the Wald test. Results: The effect of sociotropy was consistently greater than the effect of Il-1ra and IL-6 in predicting depression. However, those caregivers with high sociotropy and CRP values of - 10 had more than a 6-fold increase in depression risk compared to caregivers with lower CRP values. Caregivers with TNF levels in the top quartile had a 3-fold increase in depression risk compared to caregivers with TNF levels in the lower quartiles. In contrast to sociotropy, autonomy had no significant effect on proinflammatory mediator levels. However, when burden was added to the model, TNF and CRP remained significant, and the odds for depression for caregivers with high level of these pro-inflammatory mediators were 4-5-fold higher than caregivers with lower levels of these mediators. Conclusion: These data suggest that caregivers with high burden are at high risk for depression and are more likely to have increased proinflammatory mediator levels. Because of these increased proinflammatory mediator levels and their link with chronic disease, health care providers need to develop strategies to prevent these elevated levels in caregivers with high burden.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Biological and Physiological Response to Caregiver Burdenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150530-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Biological and Physiological Response to Caregiver Burden</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clark, Michele C., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada in Las Vegas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">michele.clark@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hoang Thanh Nguyen, PhD; Carolyn Leach, MSN, CNP, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: When dormant vulnerabilities (personality factors sociotropy and autonomy) are activated by a stressor (caregiver burden), these personality factors become mediators to caregiver depression. However, these personality factors have not been examined in relation to physiological biomarkers. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether personality factors influence caregivers' levels of proinflammatory mediators when high levels of caregiver burden are present. Methods: A cross-sectional convenience sample (n = 106) of primarily female (55%) caregivers completed questionnaires for depression, burden, and personality factors. Serum levels of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were also evaluated. The relationship between personality factors and proinflammatory mediator levels was modeled using logistic regression using the Wald test. Results: The effect of sociotropy was consistently greater than the effect of Il-1ra and IL-6 in predicting depression. However, those caregivers with high sociotropy and CRP values of - 10 had more than a 6-fold increase in depression risk compared to caregivers with lower CRP values. Caregivers with TNF levels in the top quartile had a 3-fold increase in depression risk compared to caregivers with TNF levels in the lower quartiles. In contrast to sociotropy, autonomy had no significant effect on proinflammatory mediator levels. However, when burden was added to the model, TNF and CRP remained significant, and the odds for depression for caregivers with high level of these pro-inflammatory mediators were 4-5-fold higher than caregivers with lower levels of these mediators. Conclusion: These data suggest that caregivers with high burden are at high risk for depression and are more likely to have increased proinflammatory mediator levels. Because of these increased proinflammatory mediator levels and their link with chronic disease, health care providers need to develop strategies to prevent these elevated levels in caregivers with high burden.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:35:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:35:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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