2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150561
Type:
Presentation
Title:
BART Text Messaging Project: A Feasibility Study
Abstract:
BART Text Messaging Project: A Feasibility Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Cornelius, Judith, PhD, MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Co-Authors:Jacek Dmochowski PhD, Associate Professor
Michael Cato MBA, Director of Health Informatics
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Introduction- HIV is a significant health problem for African-American adolescents. Today, reaching adolescents with HIV prevention information requires technology, which is cost effective and requires less personnel  to implement.  Mobile cell phones (MCPs) have shown potential as a new medium for the delivery of HIV prevention information, which can be broadly diffused and sustained globally. However, the feasibility of this approach  is limited. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of delivering an adolescent HIV prevention curriculum enhanced for MCP delivery.
Methods- This study was a longitudinal  one group design with 3 time points (pre/post, 3-month follow-up).  A  convenience sample of 40 African American teens (11-13 years) were recruited to participate in the Becoming a Responsible Teen (BART) Text Messaging Project. Teens attended 7 weekly sessions, then received  daily text messages for 3 months, and returned for a graduation ceremony. Data collection tools  examined the feasibility of this approach and intervention related changes for HIV Knowledge, Perceived HIV Risk, Attitudes toward Condom Use, and HIV Risk Behaviors. Results- The text messaging approach was feasible. There were intervention related changes over time.  HIV knowledge was associated with age (p=0.04) and time (p=0.054).  Older teens had higher knowledge scores across time. Perceived HIV risk was associated with age (p=0.03) and time (p=0.009). Older teens had more confidence about protecting themselves from HIV. Attitude toward condoms use was associated with gender, age and time. Teens had increased attitudes toward condom use (p=0.0009) across time.  HIV Risk Behaviors indicated that when compared to girls, boys believed  that their HIV risk was small (p=0.07). Implications- Results of this study indicate  that MCPs should be examined as a new platform for providing HIV prevention information. Findings of this study extend research on the delivery of health promotion information with MCP technology.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBART Text Messaging Project: A Feasibility Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150561-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">BART Text Messaging Project: A Feasibility Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cornelius, Judith, PhD, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Carolina at Charlotte</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jbcornel@uncc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jacek Dmochowski PhD, Associate Professor<br/>Michael Cato MBA, Director of Health Informatics</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Introduction- HIV is a significant health problem for African-American adolescents. Today, reaching adolescents with HIV prevention information requires technology, which is cost effective and requires less personnel &nbsp;to implement.&nbsp; Mobile cell phones (MCPs) have shown potential as a new medium for the delivery of HIV prevention information, which can be broadly diffused and sustained globally. However, the feasibility of this approach &nbsp;is limited. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of delivering an adolescent HIV prevention curriculum enhanced for MCP delivery. <br/>Methods- This study was a longitudinal&nbsp; one group design with 3 time points (pre/post, 3-month follow-up).&nbsp; A &nbsp;convenience sample of 40 African American teens (11-13 years) were recruited to participate in the Becoming a Responsible Teen (BART) Text Messaging Project. Teens attended 7 weekly sessions, then received &nbsp;daily text messages for 3 months, and returned for a graduation ceremony. Data collection tools &nbsp;examined the feasibility of this approach and intervention related changes for HIV Knowledge, Perceived HIV Risk, Attitudes toward Condom Use, and HIV Risk Behaviors. Results- The text messaging approach was feasible. There were intervention related changes over time. &nbsp;HIV knowledge was associated with age (p=0.04) and time (p=0.054). &nbsp;Older teens had higher knowledge scores across time. Perceived HIV risk was associated with age (p=0.03) and time (p=0.009). Older teens had more confidence about protecting themselves from HIV. Attitude toward condoms use was associated with gender, age and time. Teens had increased attitudes toward condom use (p=0.0009) across time. &nbsp;HIV Risk Behaviors indicated that when compared to girls, boys believed&nbsp; that their HIV risk was small (p=0.07). Implications- Results of this study indicate &nbsp;that MCPs should be examined as a new platform for providing HIV prevention information. Findings of this study extend research on the delivery of health promotion information with MCP technology.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:36:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:36:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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