Comparison of Debriefing Methods After Simulation: Discussion of a Videotaped Simulation Session Versus Oral Discussion Alone

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150584
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Debriefing Methods After Simulation: Discussion of a Videotaped Simulation Session Versus Oral Discussion Alone
Abstract:
Comparison of Debriefing Methods After Simulation: Discussion of a Videotaped Simulation Session Versus Oral Discussion Alone
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Reed, Shelly J., DNP, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Assistant Teaching Professor
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] PURPOSE: The purpose of the research was to compare two debriefing methods following simulation: discussion of a videotaped simulation and oral discussion alone.
BACKGROUND: Simulation is used in nursing education as a teaching strategy, as a means to practice clinical skills, or for assessment and evaluation of student skills.  As an experiential learning technique, a simulation generally consists of a preparation phase, enactment of the simulation scenario, and a debriefing. Debriefing helps simulation participants to understand, analyze and synthesize their thoughts, feelings and actions during a simulation.  Minimal information is available in the nursing literature specific to the debriefing experience of nursing students.  Examination of this experience is needed to understand learning during debriefing and thus maximize learning achieved during the educational processes that occur during the debriefing period.
METHOD:  As no instruments specific to the debriefing experience were available, the Debriefing Experience Scale was developed using the ?Classic Test Theory? (Burns & Grove, 2009).  Following factor analysis and instrument refinement (Pett & Lackey, 2003) this instrument was used to compare the nursing student experience between debriefing methods.  T-test analysis was performed on collected data to compare the two debriefing methods.
RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the student experience during debriefing between discussion of a videotaped simulation and oral discussion alone.
IMPLICATIONS:  With simulation use increasing in nursing education, understanding the student debriefing experience is essential to enhance student learning. Examination of the student experience during debriefing will hopefully lead to improved experiences for nursing students, resulting in increased student learning during debriefing. 
Burns, N., & Grove, S. K.  (2009). The Practice of Nursing Research (9th Ed).  Philadelphia:  Elsevier.
Pett, M. A., Lackey, N. R., & Sullivan, J. J.  (2003). Making Sense of Factor Analysis.  Thousand Oaks:  Sage Publications, Inc.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Debriefing Methods After Simulation: Discussion of a Videotaped Simulation Session Versus Oral Discussion Aloneen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150584-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Debriefing Methods After Simulation: Discussion of a Videotaped Simulation Session Versus Oral Discussion Alone</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reed, Shelly J., DNP, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Teaching Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shelly-reed@byu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] PURPOSE: The purpose of the research was to compare two debriefing methods following simulation: discussion of a videotaped simulation and oral discussion alone. <br/>BACKGROUND: Simulation is used in nursing education as a teaching strategy, as a means to practice clinical skills, or for assessment and evaluation of student skills.&nbsp; As an experiential learning technique, a simulation generally consists of a preparation phase, enactment of the simulation scenario, and a debriefing. Debriefing helps simulation participants to understand, analyze and synthesize their thoughts, feelings and actions during a simulation.&nbsp; Minimal information is available in the nursing literature specific to the debriefing experience of nursing students.&nbsp; Examination of this experience is needed to understand learning during debriefing and thus maximize learning achieved during the educational processes that occur during the debriefing period. <br/>METHOD:&nbsp; As no instruments specific to the debriefing experience were available, the Debriefing Experience Scale was developed using the ?Classic Test Theory? (Burns &amp; Grove, 2009).&nbsp; Following factor analysis and instrument refinement (Pett &amp; Lackey, 2003) this instrument was used to compare the nursing student experience between debriefing methods.&nbsp; T-test analysis was performed on collected data to compare the two debriefing methods. <br/>RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the student experience during debriefing between discussion of a videotaped simulation and oral discussion alone. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: &nbsp;With simulation use increasing in nursing education, understanding the student debriefing experience is essential to enhance student learning. Examination of the student experience during debriefing will hopefully lead to improved experiences for nursing students, resulting in increased student learning during debriefing.&nbsp; <br/>Burns, N., &amp; Grove, S. K.&nbsp; (2009). The Practice of Nursing Research (9th Ed).&nbsp; Philadelphia:&nbsp; Elsevier. <br/>Pett, M. A., Lackey, N. R., &amp; Sullivan, J. J.&nbsp; (2003). Making Sense of Factor Analysis.&nbsp; Thousand Oaks:&nbsp; Sage Publications, Inc.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:37:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:37:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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