2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150585
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attitude toward the own aging, functionality and disability
Abstract:
Attitude toward the own aging, functionality and disability
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Salazar, Bertha Cecilia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Nursing College, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Perla Lizeth Hernandez BS, MNS, Assistant Research Scientist
Mirtha Idalia Celestino RN, BS, Associate Professor
[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose:  To know influencing factors on attitude toward own aging and its relation to functionality including gait and disability in a group of Mexican older adults.
Methods:  A descriptive correlational design was used. A random sample using the square as conglomerate was drawn. Sample size was estimated with the following criteria: .05 significance level, 90% power, r = .40 effect size resulting in 62 older adults, but considering a design effect (square as conglomerate) and a 10% of not response the sample size was increased to 103. The Mini Mental State Examination was used as a screening test. An attitude toward aging questionnaire, the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument and Tinetti?s Gait Index were applied. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the School of Nursing, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo León, all participants gave oral informed consent. 
Results: Mean age was 70.99 years (SD = 7.96; 60-97), years attended school was 4.50 years (SD = 4.05; 0-17); number of diseases was 2.29 (SD = 1.25; 0-5) and medicines 3.17 (SD = 2.39; 0-10). Sixty four percent (66) were women. Multivariate analysis showed that age, disease and medications affected attitude toward aging (all ps equal to or greater than 0.05). Age and number of disease also affected functionality, temporo-spacial characteristics of gait on Tinetti test, and disability (p < .001). Gender influenced length and cycle of step (ps < .038). A better attitude was significantly correlated to functionality (rs= .42) and to less disability ( = .52). Functionality and gait were significantly correlated (rs = .34); functionality affected disability (p = .001, R square = 48%).
Conclusion: Those with more age, more diseases and medications showed a less positive attitude.  A positive attitude towards own aging related to functionality and disability, and functionality determines disability of older adults.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttitude toward the own aging, functionality and disabilityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150585-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attitude toward the own aging, functionality and disability</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Salazar, Bertha Cecilia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Nursing College, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bceci195@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Perla Lizeth Hernandez BS, MNS, Assistant Research Scientist<br/>Mirtha Idalia Celestino RN, BS, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose:&nbsp; To know influencing factors on attitude toward own aging and its relation to functionality including gait and disability in a group of Mexican older adults. <br/>Methods:&nbsp;&nbsp;A descriptive correlational design was used. A random sample using the square as conglomerate was drawn. Sample size was estimated with the following criteria: .05 significance level, 90% power, r = .40 effect size resulting in 62 older adults, but considering a design effect (square as conglomerate) and a 10% of not response the sample size was increased to 103. The Mini Mental State Examination was used as a screening test. An attitude toward aging questionnaire, the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument and Tinetti?s Gait Index were applied. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the School of Nursing, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Le&oacute;n, all participants gave oral informed consent.&nbsp; <br/>Results:&nbsp;Mean age was 70.99 years (SD = 7.96; 60-97), years attended school was 4.50 years (SD = 4.05; 0-17); number of diseases was 2.29 (SD = 1.25; 0-5) and medicines 3.17 (SD = 2.39; 0-10). Sixty four percent (66) were women. Multivariate analysis showed that age, disease and medications affected attitude toward aging (all ps equal to or greater than 0.05). Age and number of disease also affected functionality, temporo-spacial characteristics of gait on Tinetti test, and disability (p &lt; .001). Gender influenced length and cycle of step (ps &lt; .038). A better attitude was significantly correlated to functionality (rs= .42) and to less disability ( = .52). Functionality and gait were significantly correlated (rs = .34); functionality affected disability (p = .001, R square = 48%). <br/>Conclusion:&nbsp;Those with more age, more diseases and medications showed a less positive attitude.&nbsp; A positive attitude towards own aging related to functionality and disability, and functionality determines disability of older adults.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:37:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:37:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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