International Christian Community-Based Healthcare: Collaboration for Indigenous Health

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150602
Type:
Presentation
Title:
International Christian Community-Based Healthcare: Collaboration for Indigenous Health
Abstract:
International Christian Community-Based Healthcare: Collaboration for Indigenous Health
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Elliott, Susan E., PhD, RNC, FNP, WHNP
P.I. Institution Name:Azusa Pacific University
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing; Chair, International Studies Task Force
Modern nursing was founded in international Christian community health. Nightingale responded to a call from God to service, traveled to another country, and served the ?community? to improve the health and well-being of masses. The 1978 primary health care Declaration of Alma Ata set forth to place health care back into communities. Unfortunately, outsiders decided what the community needed, arriving with pre-determined goals, agendas and process. According to the Director-General of the World Health Organization (1999), twenty years later we knew we had failed. Therefore, another paradigm shift was warranted. Clinicians need to listen to the voice of the community and the community needs to develop a responsibility and ownership of its own health. This presentation discusses the role of nursing in the development, implementation and outcomes of Christian community-based health care programs (CBHC) in India and Papua New Guinea. CBHC as prevention requires each community to define health through identification of their personal, cultural, societal, spiritual, environmental, and political causes of disease, illness and risks. Through this process, these medically underserved are empowered to develop and mobilize strategies for improvement and/or elimination of there causers and together improve their broader definition and expectation of health. CBHC domains include the childbirth year, nutrition, sanitation, pure water supply, immunizations, environmental safety/violence prevention, and the prevention and intervention relating to chronic disease and infectious disease. All domains are implemented and sustained through indigenous developmental programs, especially those established for women and through the use of Village Health Workers and Traditional Birth Attendants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInternational Christian Community-Based Healthcare: Collaboration for Indigenous Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150602-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">International Christian Community-Based Healthcare: Collaboration for Indigenous Health</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Elliott, Susan E., PhD, RNC, FNP, WHNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Azusa Pacific University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing; Chair, International Studies Task Force</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">selliott@apu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Modern nursing was founded in international Christian community health. Nightingale responded to a call from God to service, traveled to another country, and served the ?community? to improve the health and well-being of masses. The 1978 primary health care Declaration of Alma Ata set forth to place health care back into communities. Unfortunately, outsiders decided what the community needed, arriving with pre-determined goals, agendas and process. According to the Director-General of the World Health Organization (1999), twenty years later we knew we had failed. Therefore, another paradigm shift was warranted. Clinicians need to listen to the voice of the community and the community needs to develop a responsibility and ownership of its own health. This presentation discusses the role of nursing in the development, implementation and outcomes of Christian community-based health care programs (CBHC) in India and Papua New Guinea. CBHC as prevention requires each community to define health through identification of their personal, cultural, societal, spiritual, environmental, and political causes of disease, illness and risks. Through this process, these medically underserved are empowered to develop and mobilize strategies for improvement and/or elimination of there causers and together improve their broader definition and expectation of health. CBHC domains include the childbirth year, nutrition, sanitation, pure water supply, immunizations, environmental safety/violence prevention, and the prevention and intervention relating to chronic disease and infectious disease. All domains are implemented and sustained through indigenous developmental programs, especially those established for women and through the use of Village Health Workers and Traditional Birth Attendants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:37:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:37:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.