2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150632
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Schizophrenia and Violence: The Perspective of Case Managers
Abstract:
Schizophrenia and Violence: The Perspective of Case Managers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Rice, Elizabeth I., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin Madison
Title:PhD, RN
Violence against women is a major public health problem. For women diagnosed with severe mental illness the rate of violence is significantly higher than for women in the general population. Recent studies have indicated that this population of women experiences a high prevalence of both physical and sexual abuse. There has been a growing interest by state and local communities to develop intervention programs for women with severe mental illness and histories of violence. However, data to guide program development are lacking. Community mental health practitioners could play a key role in helping these women. They hear women?s stories of violence but report feeling ill equipped to adequately provide support. This interpretive phenomenological study was undertaken to examine the perceptions of mental health case managers who hear stories of violence from women. Themes that were developed from this study included: Schizophrenia and Violence: Knowing and Avoiding, Accepting and Forsaking, and Being Supportive and Overwhelmed. Case managers were aware of the negative effects of violence on women but for a variety of reasons avoided addressing them. Violence was understood as common and case managers had little hope for the possibility of change. They saw themselves as advocates for women, but were frustrated with their evolving roles and felt overwhelmed and alienated from women?s problems with violence. This study identifies the common meanings and shared practices of case managers who work with women living with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and a history of violence. Provider stories were designed to illuminate understandings of mental health practices that help or hinder this population of women. Opportunities for practice, education, and research are suggested. The results of this study inform practice and research by illuminating how mental health systems have failed to assist women with violence prevention and treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSchizophrenia and Violence: The Perspective of Case Managersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150632-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Schizophrenia and Violence: The Perspective of Case Managers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rice, Elizabeth I., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rice.ei@gmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Violence against women is a major public health problem. For women diagnosed with severe mental illness the rate of violence is significantly higher than for women in the general population. Recent studies have indicated that this population of women experiences a high prevalence of both physical and sexual abuse. There has been a growing interest by state and local communities to develop intervention programs for women with severe mental illness and histories of violence. However, data to guide program development are lacking. Community mental health practitioners could play a key role in helping these women. They hear women?s stories of violence but report feeling ill equipped to adequately provide support. This interpretive phenomenological study was undertaken to examine the perceptions of mental health case managers who hear stories of violence from women. Themes that were developed from this study included: Schizophrenia and Violence: Knowing and Avoiding, Accepting and Forsaking, and Being Supportive and Overwhelmed. Case managers were aware of the negative effects of violence on women but for a variety of reasons avoided addressing them. Violence was understood as common and case managers had little hope for the possibility of change. They saw themselves as advocates for women, but were frustrated with their evolving roles and felt overwhelmed and alienated from women?s problems with violence. This study identifies the common meanings and shared practices of case managers who work with women living with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and a history of violence. Provider stories were designed to illuminate understandings of mental health practices that help or hinder this population of women. Opportunities for practice, education, and research are suggested. The results of this study inform practice and research by illuminating how mental health systems have failed to assist women with violence prevention and treatment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:38:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:38:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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