A Partnership Model for Community Assessment, Planning and Evidence-Based Interventions, which Promote Health of High-Risk Populations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150645
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Partnership Model for Community Assessment, Planning and Evidence-Based Interventions, which Promote Health of High-Risk Populations
Abstract:
A Partnership Model for Community Assessment, Planning and Evidence-Based Interventions, which Promote Health of High-Risk Populations
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Sternas, Kathleen A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Mary Ann Scharf, EdD
Objectives: This presentation describes a model of community partnership which includes community health assessment, planning and interventions that have demonstrated positive outcomes for high-risk populations, agency partners and students. Design: A descriptive design was used. Sample, Setting: Traditional (n=131) and accelerated (second degree, n=108) community health nursing students and 62 agency partners participated. Variables: cultural awareness; competence in assessment and interventions for high-risk communities; collaboration with culturally diverse professionals; leadership; Internet abilities; interest in community nursing. Methods: Students selected topics from a list developed by partners and faculty for assessment and intervention projects. The model focuses on students collaborating with partners, community members, and faculty to assess health needs of high-risk populations. Students plan, implement and evaluate interventions that meet needs like asthma, lead poisoning, homelessness, violence, obesity, immunizations, alcohol, smoking, communicable diseases, and bioterrorism. Students and partners completed formal evaluations which measured project outcomes. Findings: Partner evaluations: 100% agreed assessments and interventions met community needs, findings were useful in program planning.  Interventions decreased community health problems and promoted health. Interventions included: asthma triggers computer program; smoking during pregnancy brochure; STD brochure which increased clinic attendance; mental illness manual; watch alarm to increase HIV clients? medication compliance; town bioterrorism plan. Student benefits included: expertise in caring for high-risk populations; leadership; evidence of effective interventions. Outcomes from 2004 data: 100% traditional (n=31) and 100% accelerated (n=22) agreed experiences promoted cultural awareness; 96.77% traditional and 100% accelerated collaborated with diverse professionals; 100% of both groups reported increased competence in planning community interventions, improved Internet abilities, and interest in community work. Conclusions: The partnership model meets needs of high-risk populations, results in positive outcomes for partners and students, and increases health planning knowledge. Findings have implications for policy development and health promotion interventions for high-risk populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Partnership Model for Community Assessment, Planning and Evidence-Based Interventions, which Promote Health of High-Risk Populationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150645-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Partnership Model for Community Assessment, Planning and Evidence-Based Interventions, which Promote Health of High-Risk Populations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sternas, Kathleen A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sternaka@shu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Ann Scharf, EdD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: This presentation describes a model of community partnership which includes community health assessment, planning and interventions that have demonstrated positive outcomes for high-risk populations, agency partners and students. Design: A descriptive design was used. Sample, Setting: Traditional (n=131) and accelerated (second degree, n=108) community health nursing students and 62 agency partners participated. Variables: cultural awareness; competence in assessment and interventions for high-risk communities; collaboration with culturally diverse professionals; leadership; Internet abilities; interest in community nursing. Methods: Students selected topics from a list developed by partners and faculty for assessment and intervention projects. The model focuses on students collaborating with partners, community members, and faculty to assess health needs of high-risk populations. Students plan, implement and evaluate interventions that meet needs like asthma, lead poisoning, homelessness, violence, obesity, immunizations, alcohol, smoking, communicable diseases, and bioterrorism. Students and partners completed formal evaluations which measured project outcomes. Findings: Partner evaluations: 100% agreed assessments and interventions met community needs, findings were useful in program planning.&nbsp; Interventions decreased community health problems and promoted health. Interventions included: asthma triggers computer program; smoking during pregnancy brochure; STD brochure which increased clinic attendance; mental illness manual; watch alarm to increase HIV clients? medication compliance; town bioterrorism plan. Student benefits included: expertise in caring for high-risk populations; leadership; evidence of effective interventions. Outcomes from 2004 data: 100% traditional (n=31) and 100% accelerated (n=22) agreed experiences promoted cultural awareness; 96.77% traditional and 100% accelerated collaborated with diverse professionals; 100% of both groups reported increased competence in planning community interventions, improved Internet abilities, and interest in community work. Conclusions: The partnership model meets needs of high-risk populations, results in positive outcomes for partners and students, and increases health planning knowledge. Findings have implications for policy development and health promotion interventions for high-risk populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:38:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:38:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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