The Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Dyspnea and HRQOL in Clients with Heart Failure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150653
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Dyspnea and HRQOL in Clients with Heart Failure
Abstract:
The Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Dyspnea and HRQOL in Clients with Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Yeaw, Evelyn, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Rhode Island
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Cynthia Padula, PhD, RN, CS
Heart failure (HF) is considered to be the final pathway of all cardiac disorders and one of the most devastating of all chronic illnesses.  People with HF are living longer, but with disabling symptoms, in particular dyspnea, that erode health-related quality of life (HRQOL).   Decreased strength of the inspiratory muscles (IM) may contribute to and worsen  dyspnea in HF.  Interventions that can reduce adverse outcomes and /or improve respiratory muscle strength, specifically inspiratory muscles, are needed.  Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) is a safe, cost-effective, low technology, noninvasive intervention that can be implemented easily in the home.  The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a three-month, home-based, nurse-coached inspiratory muscle training (IMT) program employing a Threshold Device (Healthscan).  Therefore the goals of this study were twofold, to determine the effects of: (1) a nurse-coached IMT intervention in relation to inspiratory muscle strength and dyspnea, and (2)  IMT with respect to self-efficacy and physical/functional, psychosocial dimensions of HRQOL.  The framework for this study is based on Bandura?s Self ?Efficacy Theory. This research is a two-group, randomized study with repeated measures.  Subjects were randomized into either an experimental group  (IMT) (n=15) or a control group (n=16), which received a standard educational protocol.  Data were collected during six home visits over twelve weeks with follow-up telephone calls.  Selection criteria included:  adults who were community dwelling; stable Class II or Class III HF with an ejection fraction of <45%; and without co-existing pulmonary disease.   Outcome measures included:  maximal inspiratory pressure (PI  max), Perceived Exertion Scale (Borg), Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire Dyspnea Scale {CDRQ} (Guyatt), COPD Self-Efficacy Scale (Wigal), and the MOS SF 36 (Ware & Sherbourne).  Statistical analysis (SPSS 13) and post hoc analysis revealed significant differences in PImax, shortness of breath as measured by the CDRQ, and respiratory rate.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Dyspnea and HRQOL in Clients with Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150653-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Dyspnea and HRQOL in Clients with Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yeaw, Evelyn, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Rhode Island</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eyeaw@cox.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cynthia Padula, PhD, RN, CS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Heart failure (HF) is considered to be the final pathway of all cardiac disorders and one of the most devastating of all chronic illnesses.&nbsp; People with HF are living longer, but with disabling symptoms, in particular dyspnea, that erode health-related quality of life (HRQOL).&nbsp;&nbsp; Decreased strength of the inspiratory muscles (IM) may contribute to and worsen&nbsp; dyspnea in HF.&nbsp; Interventions that can reduce adverse outcomes and /or improve respiratory muscle strength, specifically inspiratory muscles, are needed.&nbsp; Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) is a safe, cost-effective, low technology, noninvasive intervention that can be implemented easily in the home.&nbsp; The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a three-month, home-based, nurse-coached inspiratory muscle training (IMT) program employing a Threshold Device (Healthscan).&nbsp; Therefore the goals of this study were twofold, to determine the effects of: (1) a nurse-coached IMT intervention in relation to inspiratory muscle strength and dyspnea, and (2)&nbsp; IMT with respect to self-efficacy and physical/functional, psychosocial dimensions of HRQOL.&nbsp; The framework for this study is based on Bandura?s Self ?Efficacy Theory. This research is a two-group, randomized study with repeated measures.&nbsp; Subjects were randomized into either an experimental group&nbsp; (IMT) (n=15) or a control group (n=16), which received a standard educational protocol.&nbsp; Data were collected during six home visits over twelve weeks with follow-up telephone calls.&nbsp; Selection criteria included:&nbsp; adults who were community dwelling; stable Class II or Class III HF with an ejection fraction of &lt;45%; and without co-existing pulmonary disease.&nbsp;&nbsp; Outcome measures included:&nbsp; maximal inspiratory pressure (PI&nbsp; max), Perceived Exertion Scale (Borg), Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire Dyspnea Scale {CDRQ} (Guyatt), COPD Self-Efficacy Scale (Wigal), and the MOS SF 36 (Ware &amp; Sherbourne).&nbsp;&nbsp;Statistical analysis (SPSS 13) and post hoc analysis revealed significant differences in PImax, shortness of breath as measured by the CDRQ, and respiratory rate.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:39:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:39:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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