2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150660
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-efficacy and role strain of parents caring for seriously ill children
Abstract:
Self-efficacy and role strain of parents caring for seriously ill children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Byrne, Mary W., PhD, NP, MPH, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Columbia University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Elana Evan, PhD; Lorie S. Goshin, RN, MSN; Matthew Erlich, BS; Jennifer L. Hsiao, BS; Ernest R. Katz, PhD; John M. Saroyan, MD and Lonnie K. Zeltzer, MD
[Research Presentation] Parental self-efficacy has been associated with parent competence and child functioning under various parenting circumstances but has not been explored well for parents of children with life-threatening illness. These parents sustain substantial burdens as they meet the challenges of family and child care during the progression of illness especially as the child moves toward end of life when symptoms typically increase in number and complexity of management. Many parents choose to remain primary caregivers throughout this period and need self-efficacy to provide the care, comfort, and life quality their child needs and to work effectively with health care providers while also protecting their own psychological and physical resources. This study is a secondary analysis of data collected in a multi-site study of parent and child communication about symptoms in children with serious illness (L. Zeltzer, P.I.). For a subset of 33 children with serious illness enrolled in the primary study at clinical facilities affiliated with University of California Los Angeles or the Columbia University Medical Center in New York, a descriptive profile and relationships among measures of parental self-efficacy, caregiver strain, and parent moods are analyzed and discussed relative to child and parent reports of children's predominant symptoms and symptom clusters. Instruments include the Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale (CPSS), the Caregiver Strain Index (CSI), the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and the Memorial Symptoms Assessment Scale (MSAS). Instruments designed for other populations (CPSS, CSI) had satisfactory psychometrics with this sample. Parents had extraordinarily high burden scores (mean CSI 8.03 and 44% > 10 where 8 indicates great stress) but also had relatively high average self-efficacy on a scale of 10 -100 for their child's pain (73.9 sd 15.8 ), functioning (80.8 sd 18), and coping (73.4 sd 16.5). Wide individual variations and mood relationships suggest need to provide tailored interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-efficacy and role strain of parents caring for seriously ill childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150660-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-efficacy and role strain of parents caring for seriously ill children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Byrne, Mary W., PhD, NP, MPH, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Columbia University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mwb4@columbia.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elana Evan, PhD; Lorie S. Goshin, RN, MSN; Matthew Erlich, BS; Jennifer L. Hsiao, BS; Ernest R. Katz, PhD; John M. Saroyan, MD and Lonnie K. Zeltzer, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Parental self-efficacy has been associated with parent competence and child functioning under various parenting circumstances but has not been explored well for parents of children with life-threatening illness. These parents sustain substantial burdens as they meet the challenges of family and child care during the progression of illness especially as the child moves toward end of life when symptoms typically increase in number and complexity of management. Many parents choose to remain primary caregivers throughout this period and need self-efficacy to provide the care, comfort, and life quality their child needs and to work effectively with health care providers while also protecting their own psychological and physical resources. This study is a secondary analysis of data collected in a multi-site study of parent and child communication about symptoms in children with serious illness (L. Zeltzer, P.I.). For a subset of 33 children with serious illness enrolled in the primary study at clinical facilities affiliated with University of California Los Angeles or the Columbia University Medical Center in New York, a descriptive profile and relationships among measures of parental self-efficacy, caregiver strain, and parent moods are analyzed and discussed relative to child and parent reports of children's predominant symptoms and symptom clusters. Instruments include the Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale (CPSS), the Caregiver Strain Index (CSI), the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and the Memorial Symptoms Assessment Scale (MSAS). Instruments designed for other populations (CPSS, CSI) had satisfactory psychometrics with this sample. Parents had extraordinarily high burden scores (mean CSI 8.03 and 44% &gt; 10 where 8 indicates great stress) but also had relatively high average self-efficacy on a scale of 10 -100 for their child's pain (73.9 sd 15.8 ), functioning (80.8 sd 18), and coping (73.4 sd 16.5). Wide individual variations and mood relationships suggest need to provide tailored interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:39:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:39:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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