2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150668
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Students' Perceptions and Engagement in Clinical Academic Dishonesty
Abstract:
Nursing Students' Perceptions and Engagement in Clinical Academic Dishonesty
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Dubas, Jenna M., MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:BryanLGH College of Health Sciences
Title:Assistant Professor
[Evidence-based Presentation] Studies have shown that nursing students are similar to other college students in their engagement in classroom academic dishonesty. However, because nursing students provide patient care, their dishonesty in the clinical setting may impact patient safety. A convenience sample of 241 diploma and baccalaureate nursing students were surveyed using a 76-item questionnaire to investigate the relationship between clinical academic dishonesty and (a) demographic variables, (b) nursing students' perceptions of unethical behaviors and (c) classroom academic dishonesty. Over half of participants reported they had engaged in clinical academic dishonesty.á Students who reported fewer weekly study hours were significantly more likely to report engagement in dishonest clinical activities that could result in felony charges.á The most frequently reported unethical clinical behavior was breaching patient confidentiality, followed by stealing hospital equipment, documenting client observations that were not made, and falsely calling in sick for the clinical experience. Students were least likely to agree falsely calling in sick for clinical experiences was unethical, followed by stealing hospital equipment, not questioning a physician order when in doubt, and not providing information to a client about treatment, medications, or recommended health behaviors. There was a significant inverse relationship between participants' perceptions that a behavior was unethical and reported engagement in the behavior. Pearson R correlations revealed a positive relationship between engagement in clinical and classroom academic dishonesty.áSome unethical clinical behaviors seemingly reflect insufficient moral development.áTo deter these behaviors, nurse educators must model exemplary behavior, help students correlate honesty to quality patient care, reinforce the legal and professional implications of the behaviors, and hold students accountable. Other unethical clinical behaviors reflect honest mistakes with dishonest follow-up. Nurse educators may deter these behaviors by emanating characteristics of mentors or facilitators, rather than evaluators expecting perfection.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Students' Perceptions and Engagement in Clinical Academic Dishonestyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150668-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Students' Perceptions and Engagement in Clinical Academic Dishonesty</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dubas, Jenna M., MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">BryanLGH College of Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jenna.dubas@bryanlgh.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] Studies have shown that nursing students are similar to other college students in their engagement in classroom academic dishonesty. However, because nursing students provide patient care, their dishonesty in the clinical setting may impact patient safety. A convenience sample of 241 diploma and baccalaureate nursing students were surveyed using a 76-item questionnaire to investigate the relationship between clinical academic dishonesty and (a) demographic variables, (b) nursing students' perceptions of unethical behaviors and (c) classroom academic dishonesty. Over half of participants reported they had engaged in clinical academic dishonesty.&aacute; Students who reported fewer weekly study hours were significantly more likely to report engagement in dishonest clinical activities that could result in felony charges.&aacute; The most frequently reported unethical clinical behavior was breaching patient confidentiality, followed by stealing hospital equipment, documenting client observations that were not made, and falsely calling in sick for the clinical experience. Students were least likely to agree falsely calling in sick for clinical experiences was unethical, followed by stealing hospital equipment, not questioning a physician order when in doubt, and not providing information to a client about treatment, medications, or recommended health behaviors. There was a significant inverse relationship between participants' perceptions that a behavior was unethical and reported engagement in the behavior. Pearson R correlations revealed a positive relationship between engagement in clinical and classroom academic dishonesty.&aacute;Some unethical clinical behaviors seemingly reflect insufficient moral development.&aacute;To deter these behaviors, nurse educators must model exemplary behavior, help students correlate honesty to quality patient care, reinforce the legal and professional implications of the behaviors, and hold students accountable. Other unethical clinical behaviors reflect honest mistakes with dishonest follow-up. Nurse educators may deter these behaviors by emanating characteristics of mentors or facilitators, rather than evaluators expecting perfection.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:39:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:39:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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