2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150672
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nightingale's Influence on Health Policy for The Poor
Abstract:
Nightingale's Influence on Health Policy for The Poor
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Freeman, Linda Holbrook, RN, DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville
[Research Presentation] Purpose:áFlorence Nightingale's voluminous writing, her network of influential acquaintances, and her public celebrity, much of which can be attributed to the publications of The Times [London], all served to influence health policy. One issue that bears Nightingale's imprint is that of public policy affecting workhouse infirmaries, a segment of the larger legislation surrounding the Poor Law of 1834.á NightingaleÆs influence is reflected both in health policy changes and in news coverage. This study explored the historical and social variables that influenced passage of The Metropolitan Poor Act [1867]. Method: A social history framework was used to examine events related to workhouse infirmaries and health policy in the context of social themes of the Victorian Era.áHistorical research methods were used to examine primary and secondary source materials. Findings: The arguments surrounding health policy for the poor and Nightingale's influence through use of news media, networking, and nursing's image provide insight into strategies that have relevance for nurses today. The interaction between nurses and the media was then and continues to be relevant to the influence of nursing on health policy. Discussion:áPassage of The Metropolitan Poor Act [1867] was heavily influenced by events of news coverage and by Nightingale's effort. The opposition by The Times and by Nightingale to The Poor Law Amendment Act of 1934 combined to serve as a catalyst for health care reform. There was no single event that ultimately caused the reformed Act to pass, but rather a complex interaction of historical and social events. This study explored the history of reform of The Poor Law Amendment Act of 1934 with subsequent passage of The Metropolitan Poor Act [1867] and how that reform was influenced by Nightingale's proposal for reform, networking, her plan to test nursing in workhouse infirmaries, and her relationship with The Times.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNightingale's Influence on Health Policy for The Pooren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150672-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nightingale's Influence on Health Policy for The Poor</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Freeman, Linda Holbrook, RN, DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">linda.freeman@louisville.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose:&aacute;Florence Nightingale's voluminous writing, her network of influential acquaintances, and her public celebrity, much of which can be attributed to the publications of The Times [London], all served to influence health policy. One issue that bears Nightingale's imprint is that of public policy affecting workhouse infirmaries, a segment of the larger legislation surrounding the Poor Law of 1834.&aacute; Nightingale&AElig;s influence is reflected both in health policy changes and in news coverage. This study explored the historical and social variables that influenced passage of The Metropolitan Poor Act [1867]. Method: A social history framework was used to examine events related to workhouse infirmaries and health policy in the context of social themes of the Victorian Era.&aacute;Historical research methods were used to examine primary and secondary source materials. Findings: The arguments surrounding health policy for the poor and Nightingale's influence through use of news media, networking, and nursing's image provide insight into strategies that have relevance for nurses today. The interaction between nurses and the media was then and continues to be relevant to the influence of nursing on health policy. Discussion:&aacute;Passage of The Metropolitan Poor Act [1867] was heavily influenced by events of news coverage and by Nightingale's effort. The opposition by The Times and by Nightingale to The Poor Law Amendment Act of 1934 combined to serve as a catalyst for health care reform. There was no single event that ultimately caused the reformed Act to pass, but rather a complex interaction of historical and social events. This study explored the history of reform of The Poor Law Amendment Act of 1934 with subsequent passage of The Metropolitan Poor Act [1867] and how that reform was influenced by Nightingale's proposal for reform, networking, her plan to test nursing in workhouse infirmaries, and her relationship with The Times.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:39:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:39:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.