2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150716
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The impact of a child's chronic illness on the family system
Abstract:
The impact of a child's chronic illness on the family system
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Hayes, Virginia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Victoria, School of Nursing, Lower Mainland Campus
This paper will present selected findings of a Grounded Theory

study of what day-to-day life is like for families who have a child

with a long-term health problem. It will present a beginning

synthesis of theory systematically generated to enhance

understanding of the impact of pediatric chronic illness within the

family unit or system, an approach rarely seen in professional

health care literature.



It is estimated that 10 to 15 percent of children have a chronic

physical condition. Most of these are cared for within their

families, saving substantial amounts for the health care system and

insurance schemes, but costing the families themselves financially,

Physically, emotionally, developmentally, and socially. It is

postulated that the chronicity of a health concern places unique

requirements for complex adaptation broadly throughout the family

system but in the past, little attempt has been made to map whole-

family responses. Existing work is theoretically piecemeal,

gleaning limited information from observations of individuals or

dyads and extrapolating (primarily by cross-level inference)

findings to conclusions about families.



Part of a continuing study, this research generated theory about

the family effects of pediatric chronicity by close examination of

longitudinal family data: observations and interviews of whole

families, individuals, and sub-groups, including children, parents

and sometimes others who interacted with them. Ten families with

verbal children were selectively sampled through advertising and

word-of-mouth reference. Data were collected by a variety of

methods in a variety of settings, wherever family activities

occurred, progressing over two to nine months with each family.

Results were analyzed through the inductive and deductive processes

of constant comparative analysis and cross-validated with data from

five quantitative family instruments designed to measure concepts

such as family environment, family functioning, and the impact of

the chronic illness.



The study described daily life as hard family work. Families

strive constantly to work things out, through the processes or

strategies of balancing, monitoring, managing, adapting,

tolerating, and maintaining the family image. In addition to the

extra family work related to having a chronically ill child member,

parents and children have individual work. Parents described their

frustrations with, and solutions for, their on-going interactions

with the health care system.



This research has implications for nursing practice, nursing

education, and nursing research. In some ways, it challenges

existing notions of family care and directs family nursing science

to intensify attempts to better understand family responses in

health care. Only then will cost-effective family interventions,

programs, and policies become better suited to families' perceived

needs, particularly in home care.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe impact of a child's chronic illness on the family systemen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150716-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The impact of a child's chronic illness on the family system</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hayes, Virginia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Victoria, School of Nursing, Lower Mainland Campus</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This paper will present selected findings of a Grounded Theory<br/><br/>study of what day-to-day life is like for families who have a child<br/><br/>with a long-term health problem. It will present a beginning<br/><br/>synthesis of theory systematically generated to enhance<br/><br/>understanding of the impact of pediatric chronic illness within the<br/><br/>family unit or system, an approach rarely seen in professional<br/><br/>health care literature.<br/><br/><br/><br/>It is estimated that 10 to 15 percent of children have a chronic<br/><br/>physical condition. Most of these are cared for within their<br/><br/>families, saving substantial amounts for the health care system and<br/><br/>insurance schemes, but costing the families themselves financially,<br/><br/>Physically, emotionally, developmentally, and socially. It is<br/><br/>postulated that the chronicity of a health concern places unique<br/><br/>requirements for complex adaptation broadly throughout the family<br/><br/>system but in the past, little attempt has been made to map whole-<br/><br/>family responses. Existing work is theoretically piecemeal,<br/><br/>gleaning limited information from observations of individuals or<br/><br/>dyads and extrapolating (primarily by cross-level inference)<br/><br/>findings to conclusions about families.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Part of a continuing study, this research generated theory about<br/><br/>the family effects of pediatric chronicity by close examination of<br/><br/>longitudinal family data: observations and interviews of whole<br/><br/>families, individuals, and sub-groups, including children, parents<br/><br/>and sometimes others who interacted with them. Ten families with<br/><br/>verbal children were selectively sampled through advertising and<br/><br/>word-of-mouth reference. Data were collected by a variety of<br/><br/>methods in a variety of settings, wherever family activities<br/><br/>occurred, progressing over two to nine months with each family.<br/><br/>Results were analyzed through the inductive and deductive processes<br/><br/>of constant comparative analysis and cross-validated with data from<br/><br/>five quantitative family instruments designed to measure concepts<br/><br/>such as family environment, family functioning, and the impact of<br/><br/>the chronic illness.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The study described daily life as hard family work. Families<br/><br/>strive constantly to work things out, through the processes or<br/><br/>strategies of balancing, monitoring, managing, adapting,<br/><br/>tolerating, and maintaining the family image. In addition to the<br/><br/>extra family work related to having a chronically ill child member,<br/><br/>parents and children have individual work. Parents described their<br/><br/>frustrations with, and solutions for, their on-going interactions<br/><br/>with the health care system.<br/><br/><br/><br/>This research has implications for nursing practice, nursing<br/><br/>education, and nursing research. In some ways, it challenges<br/><br/>existing notions of family care and directs family nursing science<br/><br/>to intensify attempts to better understand family responses in<br/><br/>health care. Only then will cost-effective family interventions,<br/><br/>programs, and policies become better suited to families' perceived<br/><br/>needs, particularly in home care.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:40:55Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:40:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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