2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150722
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Oppression of Empowerment: A Grounded Theory Approach
Abstract:
The Oppression of Empowerment: A Grounded Theory Approach
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Cumbie, Sharon, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wyoming
Research Problem Statement: Empowerment is an individual and dynamic process that assumes various forms and meanings across people, is contextually determined, and changes over time. The purpose of this study was to explore the social experience of empowerment among health care providers and clients with severe and persistent mental illness in a community health rehabilitation program. The objectives of the study were: 1) to describe the social experience of the therapeutic relationship among health care providers and clients with severe and persistent mental illness and 2) to explore the social experience of empowerment within this relationship from perspectives of both client and health care provider. Design: A qualitative descriptive design using a grounded theory approach was employed for the structure of this investigation. The purpose of utilizing the grounded theory approach was to generate comprehensive explanations of social phenomena that are grounded in reality. Population, Sample, and Setting: The population for this study included health care providers and clients with severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI) who were engaged in therapeutic relationship in a Wyoming community mental health outpatient program. The sample included 26 SPMI clients and 11 providers. The settings included both a community mental health agency and a clubhouse drop-in center for individuals with mental illness. Concept: The central concept grounding this study was empowerment. Specifically, this study sought to explore the social experience and implementation of empowerment within a rehabilitation model for the treatment of the mentally ill. Methods: Methods of data collection, data analysis, and sampling of study participants occurred simultaneously over an 18-month period. As data collection proceeded, the inquiry became increasingly focused on the emerging theoretical concern of empowerment. In-depth individual interviews, focus group discussions, and field observations were methods of ongoing data collection. A procedure of constant comparison was used to develop and refine theoretically relevant categories. Categories elicited from the data were constantly compared with data obtained earlier collection processes to identify commonalties and variations. Findings: The basic social process identified by participants regarding empowerment in the rehabilitative process was unmet expectations, which described a disparity between the expectations of the provider and the actual ability of the client to meet expectations. This process involved three reoccurring phases: expecting, compensating, and de-compensating. Four concepts – encouraging, valuing, perceiving, accommodating – were evidenced in each phase. Conclusions: Provider conceptions of empowerment focused on achievement of personal responsibility and autonomy, which created expectations for client outcome behaviors that clients were unable to sustain over time. Providers described these expectations as goal setting and encouraging. Clients described a process of trying to meet expectations despite increasing feelings of failure to do so. During focus group discussion, clients established two concepts to describe this dynamic: “treatment fatigue”, referring to the inability to meet the demand over time, and “treatment indifference”, referring to treatment goals overriding the individual needs of the person. Implications: Though the intentions of the provider were to encourage empowerment through goal setting and expectations of responsibility, the result was often perceived as oppressive by the client. Clients felt their actual needs and abilities were not perceived by providers and they frequently felt “set up to fail”. This disparity in the experience of empowerment in a rehabilitation model needs to be addressed to develop strategies for facilitating more congruency between expectation and threshold of functioning.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Oppression of Empowerment: A Grounded Theory Approachen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150722-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Oppression of Empowerment: A Grounded Theory Approach</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cumbie, Sharon, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wyoming</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sacumbie@uwyo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research Problem Statement: Empowerment is an individual and dynamic process that assumes various forms and meanings across people, is contextually determined, and changes over time. The purpose of this study was to explore the social experience of empowerment among health care providers and clients with severe and persistent mental illness in a community health rehabilitation program. The objectives of the study were: 1) to describe the social experience of the therapeutic relationship among health care providers and clients with severe and persistent mental illness and 2) to explore the social experience of empowerment within this relationship from perspectives of both client and health care provider. Design: A qualitative descriptive design using a grounded theory approach was employed for the structure of this investigation. The purpose of utilizing the grounded theory approach was to generate comprehensive explanations of social phenomena that are grounded in reality. Population, Sample, and Setting: The population for this study included health care providers and clients with severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI) who were engaged in therapeutic relationship in a Wyoming community mental health outpatient program. The sample included 26 SPMI clients and 11 providers. The settings included both a community mental health agency and a clubhouse drop-in center for individuals with mental illness. Concept: The central concept grounding this study was empowerment. Specifically, this study sought to explore the social experience and implementation of empowerment within a rehabilitation model for the treatment of the mentally ill. Methods: Methods of data collection, data analysis, and sampling of study participants occurred simultaneously over an 18-month period. As data collection proceeded, the inquiry became increasingly focused on the emerging theoretical concern of empowerment. In-depth individual interviews, focus group discussions, and field observations were methods of ongoing data collection. A procedure of constant comparison was used to develop and refine theoretically relevant categories. Categories elicited from the data were constantly compared with data obtained earlier collection processes to identify commonalties and variations. Findings: The basic social process identified by participants regarding empowerment in the rehabilitative process was unmet expectations, which described a disparity between the expectations of the provider and the actual ability of the client to meet expectations. This process involved three reoccurring phases: expecting, compensating, and de-compensating. Four concepts &ndash; encouraging, valuing, perceiving, accommodating &ndash; were evidenced in each phase. Conclusions: Provider conceptions of empowerment focused on achievement of personal responsibility and autonomy, which created expectations for client outcome behaviors that clients were unable to sustain over time. Providers described these expectations as goal setting and encouraging. Clients described a process of trying to meet expectations despite increasing feelings of failure to do so. During focus group discussion, clients established two concepts to describe this dynamic: &ldquo;treatment fatigue&rdquo;, referring to the inability to meet the demand over time, and &ldquo;treatment indifference&rdquo;, referring to treatment goals overriding the individual needs of the person. Implications: Though the intentions of the provider were to encourage empowerment through goal setting and expectations of responsibility, the result was often perceived as oppressive by the client. Clients felt their actual needs and abilities were not perceived by providers and they frequently felt &ldquo;set up to fail&rdquo;. This disparity in the experience of empowerment in a rehabilitation model needs to be addressed to develop strategies for facilitating more congruency between expectation and threshold of functioning.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:41:04Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:41:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.