2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150723
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategies for Improving Recruitment in Prevention Intervention Studies
Abstract:
Strategies for Improving Recruitment in Prevention Intervention Studies
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Kidd, Pamela
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Professor and Associate Dean
Problem: Difficulties in recruitment may threaten the scientific integrity of a prevention intervention study and increase study costs. At-risk individuals frequently are difficult to locate, engage, or retain in research studies, often as a result of unstable home or work situations. Moreover, prevention interventions are based on future risk of injury or illness that will affect only some proportion of a group. This makes it difficult to enhance the salience of individual risk to susceptible persons. This paper describes lessons learned about recruitment during a prevention intervention study1 to test the effectiveness of narrative simulation exercises in promoting safety and preventing injury among construction workers in small construction companies (< 10 employees). Framework: The intervention consisted of six reality-based latent-image narrative simulation exercises targeted to the prevention of back or fall-related injuries. Simulation development was guided by theories of narrative thinking from Bruner (1986) and Howard (1991). Design: The study was conducted using a two-group quasi-experimental design with a no-treatment control group. Methods and Sample: The sample consisted of owner-operators and supervisory and non-supervisory employees of small construction companies with standard industrial classification (SIC) codes in general, heavy, and special construction trades. Companies were randomly selected from among policyholders covered by the state worker compensation fund. On confirmation of eligibility and the owner's agreement, intervention packets were mailed for the company owner and employees to complete. Packets were distributed by the company owner, completed at home by the worker, and then mailed directly back to investigators. The intervention packet consisted of an invitation to participate, informed consent, instruction page, pre-test safety climate and demographic measures, simulation exercises with associated evaluation questionnaires, and an immediate post-test safety climate questionnaire. Return postage materials were included. Findings: Over the two years of the intervention, a total of 1073 company owners were invited to participate. Of these, 495 (46%) requested a total of 1187 intervention packets for themselves and their employees. We only received returns from 307 individuals employed by 165 companies for an individual return rate of 26% and a company return rate of 33%. Despite careful attention to recruitment issues, participation rates were no better in the last year of the intervention than they were in the first. Our experiences prompted an in-depth examination of the literature on recruitment and retention in the light of lessons learned from conducting the study. In this presentation, we discuss a systematic approach to recruitment in prevention trials involving difficult to reach at-risk groups. Issues to be discussed include: (1) Establishing sustainable access; (2) Judging trade offs between random and convenience sampling; (3) Estimating the number of participants; (4) Estimating contact and recruit time; (5) Assessing stability of the target group; (6) Examining respondent burden; (7) Piloting recruitment strategies; (8) Getting study endorsement; (9) Tailoring incentives; (10) Limiting disincentives; (11) Making the study relevant; and (12) Giving back to participants. Conclusions: The recruiting of construction workers as an "at-risk" group presents a challenge for investigators. The strategies discussed in this paper may have relevance in recruiting across trades in occupational health research and for recruiting individuals from other difficult to reach at-risk groups for participation in prevention intervention studies.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategies for Improving Recruitment in Prevention Intervention Studiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150723-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strategies for Improving Recruitment in Prevention Intervention Studies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kidd, Pamela</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Pamela.Kidd@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Difficulties in recruitment may threaten the scientific integrity of a prevention intervention study and increase study costs. At-risk individuals frequently are difficult to locate, engage, or retain in research studies, often as a result of unstable home or work situations. Moreover, prevention interventions are based on future risk of injury or illness that will affect only some proportion of a group. This makes it difficult to enhance the salience of individual risk to susceptible persons. This paper describes lessons learned about recruitment during a prevention intervention study1 to test the effectiveness of narrative simulation exercises in promoting safety and preventing injury among construction workers in small construction companies (&lt; 10 employees). Framework: The intervention consisted of six reality-based latent-image narrative simulation exercises targeted to the prevention of back or fall-related injuries. Simulation development was guided by theories of narrative thinking from Bruner (1986) and Howard (1991). Design: The study was conducted using a two-group quasi-experimental design with a no-treatment control group. Methods and Sample: The sample consisted of owner-operators and supervisory and non-supervisory employees of small construction companies with standard industrial classification (SIC) codes in general, heavy, and special construction trades. Companies were randomly selected from among policyholders covered by the state worker compensation fund. On confirmation of eligibility and the owner's agreement, intervention packets were mailed for the company owner and employees to complete. Packets were distributed by the company owner, completed at home by the worker, and then mailed directly back to investigators. The intervention packet consisted of an invitation to participate, informed consent, instruction page, pre-test safety climate and demographic measures, simulation exercises with associated evaluation questionnaires, and an immediate post-test safety climate questionnaire. Return postage materials were included. Findings: Over the two years of the intervention, a total of 1073 company owners were invited to participate. Of these, 495 (46%) requested a total of 1187 intervention packets for themselves and their employees. We only received returns from 307 individuals employed by 165 companies for an individual return rate of 26% and a company return rate of 33%. Despite careful attention to recruitment issues, participation rates were no better in the last year of the intervention than they were in the first. Our experiences prompted an in-depth examination of the literature on recruitment and retention in the light of lessons learned from conducting the study. In this presentation, we discuss a systematic approach to recruitment in prevention trials involving difficult to reach at-risk groups. Issues to be discussed include: (1) Establishing sustainable access; (2) Judging trade offs between random and convenience sampling; (3) Estimating the number of participants; (4) Estimating contact and recruit time; (5) Assessing stability of the target group; (6) Examining respondent burden; (7) Piloting recruitment strategies; (8) Getting study endorsement; (9) Tailoring incentives; (10) Limiting disincentives; (11) Making the study relevant; and (12) Giving back to participants. Conclusions: The recruiting of construction workers as an &quot;at-risk&quot; group presents a challenge for investigators. The strategies discussed in this paper may have relevance in recruiting across trades in occupational health research and for recruiting individuals from other difficult to reach at-risk groups for participation in prevention intervention studies.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:41:06Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:41:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.