Comfort Management of End-of-life and Chronically Ill Patients: A Pilot Study on Pain Level, Comfort Level, Quality of Life, Patient Satisfaction & Health Care Costs

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150726
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comfort Management of End-of-life and Chronically Ill Patients: A Pilot Study on Pain Level, Comfort Level, Quality of Life, Patient Satisfaction & Health Care Costs
Abstract:
Comfort Management of End-of-life and Chronically Ill Patients: A Pilot Study on Pain Level, Comfort Level, Quality of Life, Patient Satisfaction & Health Care Costs
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Killeen, Mary, PhD, RN, NEA-BC
P.I. Institution Name:EBP Nurse Consultants, LLC
Title:Consultant
Objective: The purpose of this pilot study is to: 1) describe successful comfort management (palliative care) interventions, 2) develop and field-test a patient satisfaction with comfort management instrument, 3) test three Nursing Outcomes Classifications (NOCs) (McCloskey & Bulechek, 2000) (pain level, comfort level, and quality of life) for their appropriateness of use as clinical tools with the study population, and 4) describe direct costs and patient/family costs associated with effective comfort management. Design: Longitudinal Descriptive design using survey questionnaires in the home setting for three weekly episodes of data collection. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The pilot study will recruit a minimum of 60 patients from two Home care/Hospice agencies located in several counties in a Midwestern U.S. state. Eligible patients include chronically ill and end-of-life adult patients with chronic or cancer pain who can understand and respond to the questionnaire. A pre-pilot study with 10 subjects was done in 2000 to estimate the content validity of the Patient Satisfaction with Comfort Management tool (Killeen, 1996) . The remainder of the data collection will take place in March, April, and May 2001. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Charts will be audited for effective comfort management interventions. The outcome variables are: pain level, comfort level, quality of life, patient satisfaction & health care costs. Methods: A user-friendly study packet consisting of a demographic form, expense diary, the five outcome instruments (pain level, comfort level, quality of life, patient satisfaction with comfort management, cost of care) and the criterion tools was developed. The criterion tools include a Visual Analogue Scale for pain and a Visual Analogue Scale for Total Comfort (Kolcaba & Steiner, 2000). The quality of life NOC will be tested for criterion-related validity using the Quality of Life Index (QLI) (Ferrans & Powers, 1992) for chronically ill patients and the Missoula-VITAS® (Byrock & Merriman, 1998) for quality of life for hospice patients. Findings: The study is in progress. Conclusions: Future research will utilize the pilot study results to conduct a quasi-experimental study on the impact of comfort management on patient outcomes among chronically ill and end-of-life patients. Results will be useful for public and health care provider education and health policy making related to comfort management outcomes measures, quality improvement methodology, and economic costs of comfort care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComfort Management of End-of-life and Chronically Ill Patients: A Pilot Study on Pain Level, Comfort Level, Quality of Life, Patient Satisfaction & Health Care Costsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150726-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comfort Management of End-of-life and Chronically Ill Patients: A Pilot Study on Pain Level, Comfort Level, Quality of Life, Patient Satisfaction &amp; Health Care Costs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Killeen, Mary, PhD, RN, NEA-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">EBP Nurse Consultants, LLC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Consultant</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mkilleen@charter.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this pilot study is to: 1) describe successful comfort management (palliative care) interventions, 2) develop and field-test a patient satisfaction with comfort management instrument, 3) test three Nursing Outcomes Classifications (NOCs) (McCloskey &amp; Bulechek, 2000) (pain level, comfort level, and quality of life) for their appropriateness of use as clinical tools with the study population, and 4) describe direct costs and patient/family costs associated with effective comfort management. Design: Longitudinal Descriptive design using survey questionnaires in the home setting for three weekly episodes of data collection. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The pilot study will recruit a minimum of 60 patients from two Home care/Hospice agencies located in several counties in a Midwestern U.S. state. Eligible patients include chronically ill and end-of-life adult patients with chronic or cancer pain who can understand and respond to the questionnaire. A pre-pilot study with 10 subjects was done in 2000 to estimate the content validity of the Patient Satisfaction with Comfort Management tool (Killeen, 1996) . The remainder of the data collection will take place in March, April, and May 2001. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Charts will be audited for effective comfort management interventions. The outcome variables are: pain level, comfort level, quality of life, patient satisfaction &amp; health care costs. Methods: A user-friendly study packet consisting of a demographic form, expense diary, the five outcome instruments (pain level, comfort level, quality of life, patient satisfaction with comfort management, cost of care) and the criterion tools was developed. The criterion tools include a Visual Analogue Scale for pain and a Visual Analogue Scale for Total Comfort (Kolcaba &amp; Steiner, 2000). The quality of life NOC will be tested for criterion-related validity using the Quality of Life Index (QLI) (Ferrans &amp; Powers, 1992) for chronically ill patients and the Missoula-VITAS&reg; (Byrock &amp; Merriman, 1998) for quality of life for hospice patients. Findings: The study is in progress. Conclusions: Future research will utilize the pilot study results to conduct a quasi-experimental study on the impact of comfort management on patient outcomes among chronically ill and end-of-life patients. Results will be useful for public and health care provider education and health policy making related to comfort management outcomes measures, quality improvement methodology, and economic costs of comfort care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:41:11Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:41:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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