2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150731
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Experience of Stigma: Types, Consequences and Management Techniques
Abstract:
The Experience of Stigma: Types, Consequences and Management Techniques
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Muhlbauer, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Objective: The study’s objectives were to (1) examine the experience of stigma from the perspective of a family member with a severely and persistently mentally ill relative, (2) analyze the experience’s impact and consequences, and (3) search for management strategies. Design: This research, part of a larger qualitative study based on a framework of symbolic interaction and dramaturgical interviewing, used an audio taped, semi-structured interview for data collection. Population, sample, setting and years: Population: Participants, through the use of purposive and convenience sampling, were obtained from the membership lists of psycho-educational groups facilitated by the researcher. Criteria were: (1) past participation in the psycho-educational group, (2) existence of a family member with a severe and persistent mental illness, (3) recent involvement (within the past 3 years) in assisting the mentally ill family member with the management of their mental illness. Family member was defined as a relative either by blood or law or a significant other in a less formalized relationship. Sample: There were 26 participants, 18 females and 8 males who ranged in age between 40-76 years. Twenty-one of the participants, 15 female and 6 male, were parents, four were spouses or significant others, one was a sibling. Setting: Participants were drawn from in and around a hundred-mile radius of a large metropolitan area in the mid-western United States. The interviews took place at a mid-western University. Years: Interviews occurred between July 24 and October 7, 1998. Concepts or variables studied together or intervention and outcome variables: This study focused on the examination of stigma as part of the experience of living with and caring for a family member with a severe and persistent mental illness. Participants’ perceptions of stigma and its impact on their lives and the life of their mentally ill family member were explored. Stigma was defined as a deeply discrediting attribute derived from derogatory beliefs about the severe and persistently mentally ill. A severely and persistent mentally ill individual was defined as an adult who met criteria for a metal illness, experienced recurrent relapses, needed periodic stabilization and, possibly, hospitalization, had been ill for over one year and was disabled in major areas of living. Methods: Guidelines for a semi-structured interview were developed that allowed exploration of the meanings related to stigma that family members perceived in the experiences that affected them. Each audio taped and transcribed interview was subjected to content analysis. Findings: Analysis revealed of both public and private domain stigma types. Private domain stigma encompassed internalized and family centered types. Public domain stigma demonstrated direct personalized and indirect institutionalized types. While all respondents acknowledged struggling with the repercussions of internalized, family centered and institutionalized stigma (that inherent in governmental and corporate policies), the majority denied having to confront public, direct, personalized manifestations. Analysis also revealed successful management strategies and self-disclosure processes. Conclusion: While not as evident as in the past because of a decrease in direct, personalized public expression, stigma remains a significant concern for families with severely and persistently mentally ill members. Families remain in need of assistance when they confront the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors reflective of stigma whether encountered publicly or privately. Implications: Information derived from this research can provide needed support and direction for nurses counseling families on managing the realities of stigma.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Experience of Stigma: Types, Consequences and Management Techniquesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150731-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Experience of Stigma: Types, Consequences and Management Techniques</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Muhlbauer, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smuhlbau@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The study&rsquo;s objectives were to (1) examine the experience of stigma from the perspective of a family member with a severely and persistently mentally ill relative, (2) analyze the experience&rsquo;s impact and consequences, and (3) search for management strategies. Design: This research, part of a larger qualitative study based on a framework of symbolic interaction and dramaturgical interviewing, used an audio taped, semi-structured interview for data collection. Population, sample, setting and years: Population: Participants, through the use of purposive and convenience sampling, were obtained from the membership lists of psycho-educational groups facilitated by the researcher. Criteria were: (1) past participation in the psycho-educational group, (2) existence of a family member with a severe and persistent mental illness, (3) recent involvement (within the past 3 years) in assisting the mentally ill family member with the management of their mental illness. Family member was defined as a relative either by blood or law or a significant other in a less formalized relationship. Sample: There were 26 participants, 18 females and 8 males who ranged in age between 40-76 years. Twenty-one of the participants, 15 female and 6 male, were parents, four were spouses or significant others, one was a sibling. Setting: Participants were drawn from in and around a hundred-mile radius of a large metropolitan area in the mid-western United States. The interviews took place at a mid-western University. Years: Interviews occurred between July 24 and October 7, 1998. Concepts or variables studied together or intervention and outcome variables: This study focused on the examination of stigma as part of the experience of living with and caring for a family member with a severe and persistent mental illness. Participants&rsquo; perceptions of stigma and its impact on their lives and the life of their mentally ill family member were explored. Stigma was defined as a deeply discrediting attribute derived from derogatory beliefs about the severe and persistently mentally ill. A severely and persistent mentally ill individual was defined as an adult who met criteria for a metal illness, experienced recurrent relapses, needed periodic stabilization and, possibly, hospitalization, had been ill for over one year and was disabled in major areas of living. Methods: Guidelines for a semi-structured interview were developed that allowed exploration of the meanings related to stigma that family members perceived in the experiences that affected them. Each audio taped and transcribed interview was subjected to content analysis. Findings: Analysis revealed of both public and private domain stigma types. Private domain stigma encompassed internalized and family centered types. Public domain stigma demonstrated direct personalized and indirect institutionalized types. While all respondents acknowledged struggling with the repercussions of internalized, family centered and institutionalized stigma (that inherent in governmental and corporate policies), the majority denied having to confront public, direct, personalized manifestations. Analysis also revealed successful management strategies and self-disclosure processes. Conclusion: While not as evident as in the past because of a decrease in direct, personalized public expression, stigma remains a significant concern for families with severely and persistently mentally ill members. Families remain in need of assistance when they confront the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors reflective of stigma whether encountered publicly or privately. Implications: Information derived from this research can provide needed support and direction for nurses counseling families on managing the realities of stigma.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:41:18Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:41:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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