2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150733
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Loss and Recovery in Women's Lives
Abstract:
Loss and Recovery in Women's Lives
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Stevens, Susan,
P.I. Institution Name:Georgia Baptist College
Title:Professor
Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe responses, issues, and strategies that inform and affirm the lives of women challenged by loss. Design: This case study analysis used a grounded theory approach to identify themes that emerged from the experiences of the women and the therapist. Population: Data were collected over a three year period from six women who were seeking ongoing mental health support in dealing with deaths of spouses or divorces. Concepts: Responses, Losses, Divorce, Death, Recovery, and Women. Methods: Interactions were reflected upon, and notes kept during the progress of recovering from the losses. Line by line analysis of notes were made until themes emerged. Comparisons were made between women, and among the two types of losses: Divorce or spousal death. Three of the women checked the themes to determine if they were characteristic of their experiences. Findings: Media portrayals of common losses will assist in underscoring the life changes characteristic of these women. The women tended to respond to losses with heightened responsibility about taking care of others and neglect of self-care. They also encountered profound feelings of culpability related to the loss. Self-esteem was especially battered because of guilt feelings and because of the intense connection that the women felt to the lost person or role. Women often described feeling shattered in loss, and many experienced loss of self. Anger tended to be a delayed response only after the women expressed their guilt and pain. Learning to let go was a crucial step in women who had been taught all their lives to hold on to things, to people, and to life patterns. Finding a new life style incorporating new goals, achievements, relationships and substitutions for time devoted to the lost person were particular challenges. As healing progressed regaining aspects of the "old" self, and then establishing a stronger self became primary goals of the alliance between the psychiatric nurse who had to facilitate without taking over, and the client who had to regain strength and autonomy. Conclusions: Hardiness in healing after loss is conceptualized through a "holding on/letting go/adding on" process. The women persevered through pain, developed new strengths, and gained confidence in dealing successfully with losses. Implications: This preliminary research, if replicated and expanded, can lead to new understandings and therapeutic techniques that could better equip nurses to stay with, strengthen, and let go of women who must cope with loss.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLoss and Recovery in Women's Livesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150733-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Loss and Recovery in Women's Lives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stevens, Susan, </td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgia Baptist College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susanystevens@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe responses, issues, and strategies that inform and affirm the lives of women challenged by loss. Design: This case study analysis used a grounded theory approach to identify themes that emerged from the experiences of the women and the therapist. Population: Data were collected over a three year period from six women who were seeking ongoing mental health support in dealing with deaths of spouses or divorces. Concepts: Responses, Losses, Divorce, Death, Recovery, and Women. Methods: Interactions were reflected upon, and notes kept during the progress of recovering from the losses. Line by line analysis of notes were made until themes emerged. Comparisons were made between women, and among the two types of losses: Divorce or spousal death. Three of the women checked the themes to determine if they were characteristic of their experiences. Findings: Media portrayals of common losses will assist in underscoring the life changes characteristic of these women. The women tended to respond to losses with heightened responsibility about taking care of others and neglect of self-care. They also encountered profound feelings of culpability related to the loss. Self-esteem was especially battered because of guilt feelings and because of the intense connection that the women felt to the lost person or role. Women often described feeling shattered in loss, and many experienced loss of self. Anger tended to be a delayed response only after the women expressed their guilt and pain. Learning to let go was a crucial step in women who had been taught all their lives to hold on to things, to people, and to life patterns. Finding a new life style incorporating new goals, achievements, relationships and substitutions for time devoted to the lost person were particular challenges. As healing progressed regaining aspects of the &quot;old&quot; self, and then establishing a stronger self became primary goals of the alliance between the psychiatric nurse who had to facilitate without taking over, and the client who had to regain strength and autonomy. Conclusions: Hardiness in healing after loss is conceptualized through a &quot;holding on/letting go/adding on&quot; process. The women persevered through pain, developed new strengths, and gained confidence in dealing successfully with losses. Implications: This preliminary research, if replicated and expanded, can lead to new understandings and therapeutic techniques that could better equip nurses to stay with, strengthen, and let go of women who must cope with loss.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:41:22Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:41:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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