2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150734
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of Web-based Course
Abstract:
Evaluation of Web-based Course
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Turley, James
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
Objective: To use formative and summative evaluation for acceptability of a Web-based course. Design: The design was a natural experiment. A Web-based course had been developed as an Introduction to Health Informatics. The same course had been taught several times by the same instructor. The evaluation model was to test the acceptability, accessibility and availability of the course material if the course was Web-based. The outcomes for the course were the same in both the Web-based and seminar based formats. The outcomes included both individual papers and ‘scientific poster sessions’ for the students’ understanding of the concepts. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population for the project included 10 students 6 of whom were nurses and 4 of whom were non-nurses.. No students dropped the course because of the perceived ‘change in format’. Despite the Web-based nature of the course, the students met in the computer classroom of the school to minimize the impact of technical failures (should they occur) on the student’s learning. Students also had access to the course materials 24 hours a day from remote locations. No attempt was made to control or measure the amount of time that the student’s spent on the course. All students signed informed consent before participating in the study. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The variables reported were the self-reported components that led to students liking or not liking the material presented each week. The students were asked to review and reflect on the material presented in the previous weeks Web-based material. They were asked each week to comment on the appropriateness of the material, the depth or amount of material, the way the material was arranged or organized, the organizational and navigational aspects of the interface, the area that gave hem the most difficulty and the area which they found to be most successful. In addition, observers watched the students navigating through material. Methods: The primary method used was a focus group approach that was recorded and transcribed. This happened weekly. Observers reviewed the actions taken by students in navigating the material on 4 occasions. The reviewers kept their own notes and did not share them with the students. The notes were later compared for commonalities in problem areas or student discussions. Findings: Generally the findings revealed that the students were receptive to the idea of Web-based courses and felt that it allowed for successful learning of the materials. Both the final papers and ‘poster session’ supported this. The students varied widely in the amount of time that they said they applied to the course material. The amount of time did not appear to be consistent from week to week for the same student, not did the topic area seem to be a variable in understanding the amount of time spent.. In areas related to their own discipline e.g. nursing taxonomies, nursing students had a higher level of interest than did students from other disciplines but they did not spend more time in the area. Conclusions: A well-designed Web-based course that is highly interactive can achieve the same high level of student success as an on-campus seminar based course. Students did not find that chat rooms were as successful in understanding complex information as the audio based discussions. Students who described their computer illiteracy in the beginning had no more difficulty than other students. Implications: A well-designed computer course is a successful alternative to on-campus courses. The areas of student to student communication and student group to faculty communication cannot be successfully address in text chat for complex information that is novel to the student population. Modeling the knowledge types of the students can lead to more successful models of Web-based education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of Web-based Courseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150734-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of Web-based Course</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Turley, James</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">james.p.turley@uth.tmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To use formative and summative evaluation for acceptability of a Web-based course. Design: The design was a natural experiment. A Web-based course had been developed as an Introduction to Health Informatics. The same course had been taught several times by the same instructor. The evaluation model was to test the acceptability, accessibility and availability of the course material if the course was Web-based. The outcomes for the course were the same in both the Web-based and seminar based formats. The outcomes included both individual papers and &lsquo;scientific poster sessions&rsquo; for the students&rsquo; understanding of the concepts. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population for the project included 10 students 6 of whom were nurses and 4 of whom were non-nurses.. No students dropped the course because of the perceived &lsquo;change in format&rsquo;. Despite the Web-based nature of the course, the students met in the computer classroom of the school to minimize the impact of technical failures (should they occur) on the student&rsquo;s learning. Students also had access to the course materials 24 hours a day from remote locations. No attempt was made to control or measure the amount of time that the student&rsquo;s spent on the course. All students signed informed consent before participating in the study. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The variables reported were the self-reported components that led to students liking or not liking the material presented each week. The students were asked to review and reflect on the material presented in the previous weeks Web-based material. They were asked each week to comment on the appropriateness of the material, the depth or amount of material, the way the material was arranged or organized, the organizational and navigational aspects of the interface, the area that gave hem the most difficulty and the area which they found to be most successful. In addition, observers watched the students navigating through material. Methods: The primary method used was a focus group approach that was recorded and transcribed. This happened weekly. Observers reviewed the actions taken by students in navigating the material on 4 occasions. The reviewers kept their own notes and did not share them with the students. The notes were later compared for commonalities in problem areas or student discussions. Findings: Generally the findings revealed that the students were receptive to the idea of Web-based courses and felt that it allowed for successful learning of the materials. Both the final papers and &lsquo;poster session&rsquo; supported this. The students varied widely in the amount of time that they said they applied to the course material. The amount of time did not appear to be consistent from week to week for the same student, not did the topic area seem to be a variable in understanding the amount of time spent.. In areas related to their own discipline e.g. nursing taxonomies, nursing students had a higher level of interest than did students from other disciplines but they did not spend more time in the area. Conclusions: A well-designed Web-based course that is highly interactive can achieve the same high level of student success as an on-campus seminar based course. Students did not find that chat rooms were as successful in understanding complex information as the audio based discussions. Students who described their computer illiteracy in the beginning had no more difficulty than other students. Implications: A well-designed computer course is a successful alternative to on-campus courses. The areas of student to student communication and student group to faculty communication cannot be successfully address in text chat for complex information that is novel to the student population. Modeling the knowledge types of the students can lead to more successful models of Web-based education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:41:24Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:41:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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