NICU Correlates of Later Cognitive Development in Low-Birth-Weight Premature Infants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150736
Type:
Presentation
Title:
NICU Correlates of Later Cognitive Development in Low-Birth-Weight Premature Infants
Abstract:
NICU Correlates of Later Cognitive Development in Low-Birth-Weight Premature Infants
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Melnyk, Bernadette, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Rochester
Title:Associate Dean for Research and Director of Center for Research & Evidence-Based
Although the mortality rate of low-birth-weight (LBW) premature infants has declined dramatically over recent years, morbidity remains high as the result of negative cognitive, neurodevelopmental, and behavioral sequelae. Although parents of LBW premature infants experience high levels of stress while their infants are in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), most parent-targeted interventions have not commenced until the time of or after discharge from the hospital. There also is a paucity of information regarding specific parenting and clinical variables during the ICU stay that correlate with later cognitive development. This secondary data analysis was conducted as part of a larger study that demonstrated the positive effects of the COPE (Creating Opportunities for Parent Empowerment) program on the outcomes of 42 LBW premature infants and their mothers. Self-regulation theory and control theory comprised the theoretical framework for the study. The purpose of the analysis was to determine which clinical and parenting variables during the NICU stay correlated with later infant cognitive development. Valid and reliable measures of maternal trait and state anxiety, total negative mood state, parenting stress, and parental beliefs were administered at selected times during hospitalization. Demographic and clinical variables also were collected throughout the NICU stay. In addition, the Mental Development Index of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development was obtained by non-biased observers at the infants' 6-month corrected ages. Findings revealed significant correlations between the COPE program, the mothers' own hospitalizations, transfer status, maternal trait and state anxiety, maternal negative mood state, parenting stress, parental beliefs regarding infants and their role, and later cognitive development. Specifically: (a) mothers who received the COPE program as well as those who had stronger beliefs about what to expect of their premature infants and their ability to parent them had infants with higher cognitive development, (b) mothers with lower trait and state anxiety as well as lower negative mood state during hospitalization had infants with higher cognitive development, (c) mothers with less NICU parenting stress and fewer of their own hospitalizations had infants with higher cognitive development, and (d) infants who were not transferred to another hospital before discharge had higher cognitive development at 6-month corrected ages. A unique contribution of this secondary data analysis is that it provides empirical support for specific parenting and clinical variables during NICU hospitalization that correlate with cognitive development of LBW premature infants at 6 months corrected age. Findings support the need for early assessment of these variables as well as for early NICU interventions with parents to decrease their anxiety and negative mood state as well as to increase their confidence in parenting their LBW premature infants.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNICU Correlates of Later Cognitive Development in Low-Birth-Weight Premature Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150736-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">NICU Correlates of Later Cognitive Development in Low-Birth-Weight Premature Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Melnyk, Bernadette, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Rochester</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research and Director of Center for Research &amp; Evidence-Based</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Bernadette_Melnyk@urmc.rochest</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although the mortality rate of low-birth-weight (LBW) premature infants has declined dramatically over recent years, morbidity remains high as the result of negative cognitive, neurodevelopmental, and behavioral sequelae. Although parents of LBW premature infants experience high levels of stress while their infants are in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), most parent-targeted interventions have not commenced until the time of or after discharge from the hospital. There also is a paucity of information regarding specific parenting and clinical variables during the ICU stay that correlate with later cognitive development. This secondary data analysis was conducted as part of a larger study that demonstrated the positive effects of the COPE (Creating Opportunities for Parent Empowerment) program on the outcomes of 42 LBW premature infants and their mothers. Self-regulation theory and control theory comprised the theoretical framework for the study. The purpose of the analysis was to determine which clinical and parenting variables during the NICU stay correlated with later infant cognitive development. Valid and reliable measures of maternal trait and state anxiety, total negative mood state, parenting stress, and parental beliefs were administered at selected times during hospitalization. Demographic and clinical variables also were collected throughout the NICU stay. In addition, the Mental Development Index of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development was obtained by non-biased observers at the infants' 6-month corrected ages. Findings revealed significant correlations between the COPE program, the mothers' own hospitalizations, transfer status, maternal trait and state anxiety, maternal negative mood state, parenting stress, parental beliefs regarding infants and their role, and later cognitive development. Specifically: (a) mothers who received the COPE program as well as those who had stronger beliefs about what to expect of their premature infants and their ability to parent them had infants with higher cognitive development, (b) mothers with lower trait and state anxiety as well as lower negative mood state during hospitalization had infants with higher cognitive development, (c) mothers with less NICU parenting stress and fewer of their own hospitalizations had infants with higher cognitive development, and (d) infants who were not transferred to another hospital before discharge had higher cognitive development at 6-month corrected ages. A unique contribution of this secondary data analysis is that it provides empirical support for specific parenting and clinical variables during NICU hospitalization that correlate with cognitive development of LBW premature infants at 6 months corrected age. Findings support the need for early assessment of these variables as well as for early NICU interventions with parents to decrease their anxiety and negative mood state as well as to increase their confidence in parenting their LBW premature infants.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:41:27Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:41:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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