2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150738
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Testing A Clinically Useful Instrument to Predict Breastfeeding Attrition
Abstract:
Testing A Clinically Useful Instrument to Predict Breastfeeding Attrition
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Lewallen, Lynne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: To test the predictive ability of a modified, more clinically useful version of the Breastfeeding Attrition Prediction Tool (BAPT). Design: Correlational, descriptive Population, Sample, Setting, Years: First-time breastfeeding mothers (n=152) who planned to breastfeed for at least 8 weeks were recruited prior to discharge from a hospital in the southeastern United States in 2001. These women completed the instrument in the first 24 to 48 hours following delivery and were called eight weeks after delivery to determine their breastfeeding status, reasons for stopping breastfeeding early, and sources of breastfeeding support in the hospital and after going home. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (Azjen, 1988) the revised BAPT consists of four subscales (positive and negative breastfeeding attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control). The revised version uses a dichotomous response format rather than the original 5-point Likert scale and has been shortened from 86 items to 71. Additionally, demographic items such as educational level and family or friends who had previously breastfed were included. Methods: The women completed the paper and pencil instrument prior to hospital discharge, then received a phone call by a registered nurse 8 weeks postpartum. Findings: Analysis of the data is nearing completion. Scores for each of the subscales will be summed, then t-tests will be used to compare breastfeeders and non-breastfeeders on the subscale scores. Logistic regression will be used to assess the ability of the modified BAPT to predict breastfeeding status at 8 weeks. Presence of family member or friend who had breastfed and educational level will also be added to the regression equation. Conclusions: Will be developed after completion of data analysis. Implications: In a practice discipline such as nursing, it is important that research be clinically relevant and clinically useful. Breastfeeding is the optimal method of infant feeding, but can be difficult to successfully initiate. With early hospital discharge for postpartum women now the norm, little time is available for intensive breastfeeding education. If women who are likely to prematurely stop breastfeeding could be identified before their hospital discharge, nursing interventions could be targeted to at-risk women to increase their chances of successful breastfeeding. The Breastfeeding Attrition Prediction Tool (BAPT), developed by Janke (1992, 1994) and modified by Dick et al. (in press) has been found to be a significant predictor of breastfeeding attrition. Administered in the early postpartal period, scores on the BAPT were able to correctly predict 77% of the women who stopped breastfeeding prior to 8 weeks. However, the BAPT as originally configured is a lengthy instrument that is time consuming for new mothers to complete and requires complex scoring. As such it is not useful as a screening tool for clinicians in fast paced, short-staffed maternity settings. This study will provide information regarding the usefulness of a shorter scale that is easier to administer and score.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTesting A Clinically Useful Instrument to Predict Breastfeeding Attritionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150738-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Testing A Clinically Useful Instrument to Predict Breastfeeding Attrition</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lewallen, Lynne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Carolina at Greensboro</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynne_lewallen@uncg.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To test the predictive ability of a modified, more clinically useful version of the Breastfeeding Attrition Prediction Tool (BAPT). Design: Correlational, descriptive Population, Sample, Setting, Years: First-time breastfeeding mothers (n=152) who planned to breastfeed for at least 8 weeks were recruited prior to discharge from a hospital in the southeastern United States in 2001. These women completed the instrument in the first 24 to 48 hours following delivery and were called eight weeks after delivery to determine their breastfeeding status, reasons for stopping breastfeeding early, and sources of breastfeeding support in the hospital and after going home. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (Azjen, 1988) the revised BAPT consists of four subscales (positive and negative breastfeeding attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control). The revised version uses a dichotomous response format rather than the original 5-point Likert scale and has been shortened from 86 items to 71. Additionally, demographic items such as educational level and family or friends who had previously breastfed were included. Methods: The women completed the paper and pencil instrument prior to hospital discharge, then received a phone call by a registered nurse 8 weeks postpartum. Findings: Analysis of the data is nearing completion. Scores for each of the subscales will be summed, then t-tests will be used to compare breastfeeders and non-breastfeeders on the subscale scores. Logistic regression will be used to assess the ability of the modified BAPT to predict breastfeeding status at 8 weeks. Presence of family member or friend who had breastfed and educational level will also be added to the regression equation. Conclusions: Will be developed after completion of data analysis. Implications: In a practice discipline such as nursing, it is important that research be clinically relevant and clinically useful. Breastfeeding is the optimal method of infant feeding, but can be difficult to successfully initiate. With early hospital discharge for postpartum women now the norm, little time is available for intensive breastfeeding education. If women who are likely to prematurely stop breastfeeding could be identified before their hospital discharge, nursing interventions could be targeted to at-risk women to increase their chances of successful breastfeeding. The Breastfeeding Attrition Prediction Tool (BAPT), developed by Janke (1992, 1994) and modified by Dick et al. (in press) has been found to be a significant predictor of breastfeeding attrition. Administered in the early postpartal period, scores on the BAPT were able to correctly predict 77% of the women who stopped breastfeeding prior to 8 weeks. However, the BAPT as originally configured is a lengthy instrument that is time consuming for new mothers to complete and requires complex scoring. As such it is not useful as a screening tool for clinicians in fast paced, short-staffed maternity settings. This study will provide information regarding the usefulness of a shorter scale that is easier to administer and score.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:41:31Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:41:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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