A Good Place for Nurses to Work: Practice Environments and Staffing in a Broad Sample of Hospitals

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150753
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Good Place for Nurses to Work: Practice Environments and Staffing in a Broad Sample of Hospitals
Abstract:
A Good Place for Nurses to Work: Practice Environments and Staffing in a Broad Sample of Hospitals
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Lake, Eileen, RN, PhD, MPP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing
Title:Research Associate
Co-Authors:Christopher Ryan Friese
Objectives: To compare the nursing practice environments of a broad set of hospitals with those of nursing “magnet” hospitals; to estimate in a broad sample the proportion of hospitals with "magnet-like" environments; to examine the associations between better or worse practice environments and hospital characteristics (e.g., bedsize) and nurse staffing.<P> Design: Secondary analysis of nurse survey data.<P> Population, Samples, Setting, Years: Community hospitals: 16 reputational magnet hospitals (1985-1986), 7 ANCC-certified magnet hospitals (1998), and 154 Pennsylvania hospitals (1999).<P> Concepts: nursing practice environment, staffing<P> Methods: The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) was used to measure and compare the nursing practice environment across the samples. Associations between the practice environment and hospital structural characteristics and staffing were analyzed by ordered logit regression and ANOVA, respectively.<P> Findings: About 20% of the broad sample had practice environments similar to those of magnet hospitals. Better or poorer environments were not associated with hospital structural characteristics. Hospitals with better practice environments also had higher staffing.<P> Conclusions: A sizable proportion of hospitals not recognized formally for nursing distinction have good nursing practice environments. No particular hospital structural characteristics appear to be necessary to provide better nursing practice environments. It appears that hospital managers address the organization of nursing as a package of social structural (i.e., the practice environment) and human resource (i.e., staffing) decisions: they either invest in nursing or they do not.<P> Implications: The common occurrence of better staffing with better practice environments, and vice versa, has theoretical and empirical implications. Both aspects of the organization of hospital nursing may operate in concert to influence nurse and patient outcomes; their separate effects may be impossible to disentangle. Research that has linked staffing ratios to patient adverse events, including death, may have accounted for the unmeasured influence of the practice environment on outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Good Place for Nurses to Work: Practice Environments and Staffing in a Broad Sample of Hospitalsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150753-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Good Place for Nurses to Work: Practice Environments and Staffing in a Broad Sample of Hospitals</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lake, Eileen, RN, PhD, MPP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">elake@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Christopher Ryan Friese</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: To compare the nursing practice environments of a broad set of hospitals with those of nursing &ldquo;magnet&rdquo; hospitals; to estimate in a broad sample the proportion of hospitals with &quot;magnet-like&quot; environments; to examine the associations between better or worse practice environments and hospital characteristics (e.g., bedsize) and nurse staffing.&lt;P&gt; Design: Secondary analysis of nurse survey data.&lt;P&gt; Population, Samples, Setting, Years: Community hospitals: 16 reputational magnet hospitals (1985-1986), 7 ANCC-certified magnet hospitals (1998), and 154 Pennsylvania hospitals (1999).&lt;P&gt; Concepts: nursing practice environment, staffing&lt;P&gt; Methods: The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) was used to measure and compare the nursing practice environment across the samples. Associations between the practice environment and hospital structural characteristics and staffing were analyzed by ordered logit regression and ANOVA, respectively.&lt;P&gt; Findings: About 20% of the broad sample had practice environments similar to those of magnet hospitals. Better or poorer environments were not associated with hospital structural characteristics. Hospitals with better practice environments also had higher staffing.&lt;P&gt; Conclusions: A sizable proportion of hospitals not recognized formally for nursing distinction have good nursing practice environments. No particular hospital structural characteristics appear to be necessary to provide better nursing practice environments. It appears that hospital managers address the organization of nursing as a package of social structural (i.e., the practice environment) and human resource (i.e., staffing) decisions: they either invest in nursing or they do not.&lt;P&gt; Implications: The common occurrence of better staffing with better practice environments, and vice versa, has theoretical and empirical implications. Both aspects of the organization of hospital nursing may operate in concert to influence nurse and patient outcomes; their separate effects may be impossible to disentangle. Research that has linked staffing ratios to patient adverse events, including death, may have accounted for the unmeasured influence of the practice environment on outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:41:56Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:41:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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