Is Partner Notification for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Acceptable to Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM)? An Exploration of the Lay Perspective in the Context of an Outbreak of Syphilis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150759
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is Partner Notification for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Acceptable to Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM)? An Exploration of the Lay Perspective in the Context of an Outbreak of Syphilis
Abstract:
Is Partner Notification for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Acceptable to Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM)? An Exploration of the Lay Perspective in the Context of an Outbreak of Syphilis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Coleman, Claire, BA, PG, Dip
P.I. Institution Name:Trinity College
Co-Authors:Cecily Begley, RGN, RM, RNT, FFNRCSI, DIP, N, Ed, DIP, Stats, MSC, PhD; Maria Lohan, N/A; Colm Bergin, N/A; Susan Hopkins, N/A; Fiona Mulcahy, N/A
Objective: To explore the acceptability of partner notification in the context of an outbreak of syphilis among MSM. Design: A qualitative component of a larger mixed method study will be described. Concept studied: Partner notification is the practice of informing partners exposed to STIs of their exposure. The index patient (person with the infection) usually does this, or, alternatively, a health professional may inform the sexual partner without disclosing the identity of the index patient. Sample and Setting: The sample is 15 MSM who were diagnosed with syphilis and a further 15 MSM attending a clinic as a result of partner notification, in the year 2003. The settings for the study are two sexual health clinics; one, the largest clinic in Ireland, and the second the only community based MSM sexual health service in Ireland. Methods: Semi- structured individual interviews were carried out, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Findings: The findings of this research highlight the complexity of individuals’ concerns; while their own health and the health of others is very often an issue, there are potentially other concerns that may act as barriers to partner notification. Themes that emerged were concerns about privacy, the stigma of sexually transmitted infections, the issue of anonymous sex and the impact of disclosure on relationships. Conclusions: The study has provided a rich insight into the perspective of men who have sex with men affected or infected by syphilis. While the practice of partner notification is often considered acceptable, the complexity of the issues for individuals affected should not be underestimated. Implications: Partner notification, to operate effectively, depends on the willingness of the person with infection to inform or to voluntarily disclose details of his partners. It is necessary that the barriers to acceptability are therefore acknowledged and, if possible, addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs Partner Notification for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Acceptable to Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM)? An Exploration of the Lay Perspective in the Context of an Outbreak of Syphilisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150759-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Is Partner Notification for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Acceptable to Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM)? An Exploration of the Lay Perspective in the Context of an Outbreak of Syphilis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coleman, Claire, BA, PG, Dip</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Trinity College</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">colemac@tcd.ie</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cecily Begley, RGN, RM, RNT, FFNRCSI, DIP, N, Ed, DIP, Stats, MSC, PhD; Maria Lohan, N/A; Colm Bergin, N/A; Susan Hopkins, N/A; Fiona Mulcahy, N/A</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To explore the acceptability of partner notification in the context of an outbreak of syphilis among MSM. Design: A qualitative component of a larger mixed method study will be described. Concept studied: Partner notification is the practice of informing partners exposed to STIs of their exposure. The index patient (person with the infection) usually does this, or, alternatively, a health professional may inform the sexual partner without disclosing the identity of the index patient. Sample and Setting: The sample is 15 MSM who were diagnosed with syphilis and a further 15 MSM attending a clinic as a result of partner notification, in the year 2003. The settings for the study are two sexual health clinics; one, the largest clinic in Ireland, and the second the only community based MSM sexual health service in Ireland. Methods: Semi- structured individual interviews were carried out, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Findings: The findings of this research highlight the complexity of individuals&rsquo; concerns; while their own health and the health of others is very often an issue, there are potentially other concerns that may act as barriers to partner notification. Themes that emerged were concerns about privacy, the stigma of sexually transmitted infections, the issue of anonymous sex and the impact of disclosure on relationships. Conclusions: The study has provided a rich insight into the perspective of men who have sex with men affected or infected by syphilis. While the practice of partner notification is often considered acceptable, the complexity of the issues for individuals affected should not be underestimated. Implications: Partner notification, to operate effectively, depends on the willingness of the person with infection to inform or to voluntarily disclose details of his partners. It is necessary that the barriers to acceptability are therefore acknowledged and, if possible, addressed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:42:05Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:42:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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