2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150765
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Families Managing Chronic Illness
Abstract:
Families Managing Chronic Illness
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Earle, Patricia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Minnesota State University, Mankato
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Mary Bliesmer, DNSc, RN; Sandra Eggenberger, MS, RN; Norma Krumwiede, EdD, RN; Sonja Meiers, PhD, RN
Abstract Objectives:The specific aims of this study were to:(1) describe the process that families in rural south central Minnesota use to manage the health experience in the context of a chronic illness, and (2) build theory related to family adaptation in chronic illness. Design: Constant comparative. Sample, Setting: The sample, of twelve families, for this study was self-selected and nurse identified The researchers contacted the families by telephone to obtain verbal permission and to schedule the family interviews, which were conducted in the participants' homes . Methods: Semi-structured interviews, were audiotaped and lasted from one to two hours. The audiotapes were then transcribed and analyzed following the constant, comparative process. Findings: The core variable revealed by these families was that of negotiating the meaning of chronic illness in the family, a process of family re-integration precipitated by the uncertainty of the particular illness. Conclusions: Families in this study were called forth to actively deal with manifestations of quite different chronic illnesses: the common thread of uncertainty presented an ongoing challenge in all situations. Throughout the process of re-integration, sophisticated efforts were made to incorporate the chronic illness into the family's existing transactional sphere. Implications: Since nursing is the diagnosis and treatment of actual or potential responses to illness or injury and the family is the identified client, knowledge development in the emerging field of family nursing must focus on the entire family health experience. This is of particular significance when the family is dealing with chronic illness over time since the family perception is critical to individual adaptation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamilies Managing Chronic Illnessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150765-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Families Managing Chronic Illness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Earle, Patricia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Minnesota State University, Mankato</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">patricia.earle@mnsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Bliesmer, DNSc, RN; Sandra Eggenberger, MS, RN; Norma Krumwiede, EdD, RN; Sonja Meiers, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Abstract Objectives:The specific aims of this study were to:(1) describe the process that families in rural south central Minnesota use to manage the health experience in the context of a chronic illness, and (2) build theory related to family adaptation in chronic illness. Design: Constant comparative. Sample, Setting: The sample, of twelve families, for this study was self-selected and nurse identified The researchers contacted the families by telephone to obtain verbal permission and to schedule the family interviews, which were conducted in the participants' homes . Methods: Semi-structured interviews, were audiotaped and lasted from one to two hours. The audiotapes were then transcribed and analyzed following the constant, comparative process. Findings: The core variable revealed by these families was that of negotiating the meaning of chronic illness in the family, a process of family re-integration precipitated by the uncertainty of the particular illness. Conclusions: Families in this study were called forth to actively deal with manifestations of quite different chronic illnesses: the common thread of uncertainty presented an ongoing challenge in all situations. Throughout the process of re-integration, sophisticated efforts were made to incorporate the chronic illness into the family's existing transactional sphere. Implications: Since nursing is the diagnosis and treatment of actual or potential responses to illness or injury and the family is the identified client, knowledge development in the emerging field of family nursing must focus on the entire family health experience. This is of particular significance when the family is dealing with chronic illness over time since the family perception is critical to individual adaptation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:42:16Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:42:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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