Screening for Intimate Partner Violence in the Health Care Setting: Lessons Learned and Challenges Ahead

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150771
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Screening for Intimate Partner Violence in the Health Care Setting: Lessons Learned and Challenges Ahead
Abstract:
Screening for Intimate Partner Violence in the Health Care Setting: Lessons Learned and Challenges Ahead
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Koziol-McLain, Jane, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Auckland University of Technology
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Nancy E. Glass, PhD, MPH, RN
Objective: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a tragedy that reflects trauma among societies, communities and individuals internationally. Early IPV identification and intervention policies are being developed for healthcare settings. Nurses have a crucial role in the development, implementation, and evaluation of this practice innovation. We were interested in critically exploring lessons learned and challenges ahead for evidence-based practice in the context of IPV screening in the healthcare setting. Methods: Two nurses critically reflected on the IPV screening literature and their experiences in education, practice, research and policy development in the western and mid-Atlantic United States as well as in New Zealand. They have provided education to nurses about how to screen safely; screened women in acute and community health settings; conducted research studies involving screening women in the healthcare setting; and, worked collaboratively with healthcare systems to develop institutional responses to IPV. Findings: Several themes emerged in reflecting on the state of implementing IPV screening: (1) reconciling the tension between randomised clinical trials and women’s stories; (2) acknowledging nurses as victims; (3) reversing years of silence; (4) broadening the issue from partner violence to trauma; (5) conceding that protocols cannot be risk free; (6) placing screening within nurses’ practice model; (7) doing more for children; (8) challenging punishment models; (9) increasing prevention activities; and (10) focusing on communities. Implications: Research is needed to examine IPV screening and interventions using mixed-methods, longitudinal, well-controlled studies that are representative of racial and ethnic minorities and gay and lesbians populations. However, even with research evidence of a positive screening effect, societal, structural and professional issues will continue to play a dominant role in determining nurses’ engagement in reducing intimate partner violence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleScreening for Intimate Partner Violence in the Health Care Setting: Lessons Learned and Challenges Aheaden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150771-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Screening for Intimate Partner Violence in the Health Care Setting: Lessons Learned and Challenges Ahead</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Koziol-McLain, Jane, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Auckland University of Technology</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jane.koziol-mclain@aut.ac.nz</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy E. Glass, PhD, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a tragedy that reflects trauma among societies, communities and individuals internationally. Early IPV identification and intervention policies are being developed for healthcare settings. Nurses have a crucial role in the development, implementation, and evaluation of this practice innovation. We were interested in critically exploring lessons learned and challenges ahead for evidence-based practice in the context of IPV screening in the healthcare setting. Methods: Two nurses critically reflected on the IPV screening literature and their experiences in education, practice, research and policy development in the western and mid-Atlantic United States as well as in New Zealand. They have provided education to nurses about how to screen safely; screened women in acute and community health settings; conducted research studies involving screening women in the healthcare setting; and, worked collaboratively with healthcare systems to develop institutional responses to IPV. Findings: Several themes emerged in reflecting on the state of implementing IPV screening: (1) reconciling the tension between randomised clinical trials and women&rsquo;s stories; (2) acknowledging nurses as victims; (3) reversing years of silence; (4) broadening the issue from partner violence to trauma; (5) conceding that protocols cannot be risk free; (6) placing screening within nurses&rsquo; practice model; (7) doing more for children; (8) challenging punishment models; (9) increasing prevention activities; and (10) focusing on communities. Implications: Research is needed to examine IPV screening and interventions using mixed-methods, longitudinal, well-controlled studies that are representative of racial and ethnic minorities and gay and lesbians populations. However, even with research evidence of a positive screening effect, societal, structural and professional issues will continue to play a dominant role in determining nurses&rsquo; engagement in reducing intimate partner violence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:42:26Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:42:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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