Predictors of Nurse Managers' Health in Canadian Restructured Health Care Settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150772
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Nurse Managers' Health in Canadian Restructured Health Care Settings
Abstract:
Predictors of Nurse Managers' Health in Canadian Restructured Health Care Settings
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Laschinger, Heather K. S., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Western Ontario
Title:Professor & Associate Dean Research, chair Graduate Programs
Co-Authors:Joan M. Almost, RN, MScN; Nancy Purdy, RN, MScN; Julia Kim, RN, BScN
Objective: To test a theoretical model linking nurse managers’ perceptions of structural and psychological empowerment to job satisfaction and physical and mental health. Design: A predictive, non-experimental survey design was used to test the model. A random sample of 203 first line and 83 middle level hospital-based nurse managers selected from the provincial registry list participated in this study. Measures: Conditions of Work Effectiveness-II (Laschinger, et al, 2000), Psychological Empowerment Questionnaire (Spreitzer, 1995), Pressure Management Indicator (Williams & Cooper, 2001), Maslach Burnout Inventory (Maslach, et al, 1996), and Global Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (Hackman & Oldman, 1975). Methods: Nurse managers were sent questionnaires by mail using the Dillman method to increase survey response. Participants returned completed questionnaires in a researcher-addressed, stamped envelope (return rate= 65%). Data were analyzed using multiple regression procedures. Findings: Nurse managers’ levels of structural and psychological empowerment were higher than those of staff nurses in previous research. Managers reported average levels of burnout but rated their mental and physical health as very good. Middle managers were significantly more empowered and satisfied with their jobs than first line managers. First line managers reported significantly less decision latitude, organizational support and personal power in their jobs. In both groups, structural and psychological empowerment explained 12% of the variance in physical health (energy level) and 13% of the variance in mental health (depressive symptomology). In both groups, approximately 45% of the variance in job satisfaction was explained by structural empowerment, psychological empowerment, and emotional exhaustion. Conclusions: Empowered work empowerments tend to lower burnout levels of nurse managers and result in greater job satisfaction and better physical and mental health. Implications: Creating work environments that provide access to empowerment structures is a fruitful strategy for creating healthy work environments for nurse managers in current restructured health care settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Nurse Managers' Health in Canadian Restructured Health Care Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150772-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Nurse Managers' Health in Canadian Restructured Health Care Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Laschinger, Heather K. S., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Western Ontario</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Associate Dean Research, chair Graduate Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hkl@uwo.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joan M. Almost, RN, MScN; Nancy Purdy, RN, MScN; Julia Kim, RN, BScN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To test a theoretical model linking nurse managers&rsquo; perceptions of structural and psychological empowerment to job satisfaction and physical and mental health. Design: A predictive, non-experimental survey design was used to test the model. A random sample of 203 first line and 83 middle level hospital-based nurse managers selected from the provincial registry list participated in this study. Measures: Conditions of Work Effectiveness-II (Laschinger, et al, 2000), Psychological Empowerment Questionnaire (Spreitzer, 1995), Pressure Management Indicator (Williams &amp; Cooper, 2001), Maslach Burnout Inventory (Maslach, et al, 1996), and Global Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (Hackman &amp; Oldman, 1975). Methods: Nurse managers were sent questionnaires by mail using the Dillman method to increase survey response. Participants returned completed questionnaires in a researcher-addressed, stamped envelope (return rate= 65%). Data were analyzed using multiple regression procedures. Findings: Nurse managers&rsquo; levels of structural and psychological empowerment were higher than those of staff nurses in previous research. Managers reported average levels of burnout but rated their mental and physical health as very good. Middle managers were significantly more empowered and satisfied with their jobs than first line managers. First line managers reported significantly less decision latitude, organizational support and personal power in their jobs. In both groups, structural and psychological empowerment explained 12% of the variance in physical health (energy level) and 13% of the variance in mental health (depressive symptomology). In both groups, approximately 45% of the variance in job satisfaction was explained by structural empowerment, psychological empowerment, and emotional exhaustion. Conclusions: Empowered work empowerments tend to lower burnout levels of nurse managers and result in greater job satisfaction and better physical and mental health. Implications: Creating work environments that provide access to empowerment structures is a fruitful strategy for creating healthy work environments for nurse managers in current restructured health care settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:42:28Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:42:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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